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  • Jasper-Troupsburg Elementary School - Troupsburg NY
    Built as a K-12 public school, the Troupsburg Central School is still extant and in use as Jasper-Troupsburg Elementary School. According to A History of Troupsburg, NY (1808-2004), "It seems likely that the new school in Troupsburg was constructed with New Deal assistance. This fact seems to be confirmed with evidence found in the dedication program. On the list of events in the dedication ceremony, there is an address given by Captain Thomas W. Poindexter. Captain Poindexter is listed as a representative of the Federal Emergency Administration of Public Works.... It seems highly unlikely that a representative from such an agency...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Schmitz Sculpture - Washington DC
    Carl Ludwig Schmitz was commissioned by the New Deal’s Treasury Section of Fine Arts to create the sculpture “City Delivery Carrier, 1863.” The sculpture was made out of an aluminum alloy, and Schmitz was paid $3,000 for the job. When this artwork was created, the present-day Clinton Federal Building was the headquarters of the U.S. Post Office Department. The Treasury Section of Fine Arts existed from 1934 to 1943. It was initially called the “Treasury Section of Painting and Sculpture”; then the “Treasury Section of Fine Arts”; and finally just “Section of Fine Arts” when it was moved under the jurisdiction...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Waugh Sculpture - Washington DC
    Sidney Biehler Waugh was commissioned by the New Deal’s Treasury Section of Fine Arts to create the sculpture “U.S. Post Stage Driver, 1789-1836.” The sculpture was made out of an aluminum alloy, and Waugh was paid $3,000 for the job. When this artwork was created, the present-day Clinton Federal Building was the headquarters of the U.S. Post Office Department. The Treasury Section of Fine Arts existed from 1934 to 1943. It was initially called the “Treasury Section of Painting and Sculpture”; then the “Treasury Section of Fine Arts”; and finally just “Section of Fine Arts” when it was moved under the...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Warneke Sculpture - Washington DC
    Heinz Warneke was commissioned by the New Deal’s Treasury Section of Fine Arts to create the sculpture “Express Mail Carrier.” The sculpture was made out of an aluminum alloy, and Warneke was paid $3,000 for the job. When this artwork was created, the present-day Clinton Federal Building was the headquarters of the U.S. Post Office Department. The Treasury Section of Fine Arts existed from 1934 to 1943. It was initially called the “Treasury Section of Painting and Sculpture”; then the “Treasury Section of Fine Arts”; and finally just “Section of Fine Arts” when it was moved under the jurisdiction of the...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Scaravaglione Sculpture - Washington DC
    Concetta Maria Scaravaglione was commissioned by the New Deal’s Treasury Section of Fine Arts to create the sculpture “Railway Mail Carrier, 1862.” The sculpture was made out of an aluminum alloy, and Scaravaglione was paid $3,000 for the job. When this artwork was created, the present-day Clinton Federal Building was the headquarters of the U.S. Post Office Department. The Treasury Section of Fine Arts existed from 1934 to 1943. It was initially called the “Treasury Section of Painting and Sculpture”; then the “Treasury Section of Fine Arts”; and finally just “Section of Fine Arts” when it was moved under the jurisdiction...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Piccirilli Sculpture - Washington DC
    Attilio Piccirilli was commissioned by the New Deal’s Treasury Section of Fine Arts to create the sculpture “Contemporary Postman.” The sculpture was made out of an aluminum alloy, and Piccirilli was paid $3,000 for the job. When this artwork was created, the present-day Clinton Federal Building was the headquarters of the U.S. Post Office Department. The Treasury Section of Fine Arts existed from 1934 to 1943. It was initially called the “Treasury Section of Painting and Sculpture”; then the “Treasury Section of Fine Arts”; and finally just “Section of Fine Arts” when it was moved under the jurisdiction of the newly-created...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Margoulies Sculpture - Washington DC
    Berta Margoulies was commissioned by the New Deal’s Treasury Section of Fine Arts to create the sculpture “Colonial Foot Postman, 1691-1775.” The sculpture was made out of an aluminum alloy, and Margoulies was paid $3,000 for the job. When this artwork was created, the present-day Clinton Federal Building was the headquarters of the U.S. Post Office Department. The Treasury Section of Fine Arts existed from 1934 to 1943. It was initially called the “Treasury Section of Painting and Sculpture”; then the “Treasury Section of Fine Arts”; and finally just “Section of Fine Arts” when it was moved under the jurisdiction of...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Maldarelli Sculpture - Washington DC
    Oronzio Maldarelli was commissioned by the New Deal’s Treasury Section of Fine Arts to create the sculpture “Airmail Pilot.” It is made out of an aluminum alloy, and Maldarelli was paid $3,000 for the job. When this artwork was created, the present-day Clinton Federal Building was the headquarters of the U.S. Post Office Department. The Treasury Section of Fine Arts existed from 1934 to 1943. It was initially called the “Treasury Section of Painting and Sculpture”; then the “Treasury Section of Fine Arts”; and finally just “Section of Fine Arts” when it was moved under the jurisdiction of the newly-created Public...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Gross Sculpture - Washington DC
    Chaim Gross was commissioned by the New Deal’s Treasury Section of Fine Arts to create the sculpture “Alaska Snowshoe Mail Carrier.” It is made out of an aluminum alloy, and Gross was paid $3,000 for the job. When this artwork was created, the present-day Clinton Federal Building was the headquarters of the U.S. Post Office Department. The Treasury Section of Fine Arts existed from 1934 to 1943. It was initially called the “Treasury Section of Painting and Sculpture”; then the “Treasury Section of Fine Arts”; and finally just “Section of Fine Arts” when it was moved under the jurisdiction of the...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Calder Sculpture - Washington DC
    Alexander Stirling Calder was commissioned by the New Deal’s Treasury Section of Fine Arts to create the sculpture “Continental Post Rider, 1775-1789.” The sculpture was made out of an aluminum alloy, and Calder was paid $3,000 for the job. When this artwork was created, the present-day Clinton Federal Building was the headquarters of the U.S. Post Office Department. The Treasury Section of Fine Arts existed from 1934 to 1943. It was initially called the “Treasury Section of Painting and Sculpture”; then the “Treasury Section of Fine Arts”; and finally just “Section of Fine Arts” when it was moved under the jurisdiction...
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