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  • Upper Rogue River Trail Section - Union Creek OR
    The Union Creek Historic District on the upper Rogue River in Union Creek, Oregon, is listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places because it is a fine representative of a type of rustic resort popular in the early 20th century and has been little altered since the 1930s.  There are almost one hundred buildings and other facilities in the Union Creek Historic District, almost all of which conform to the Forest Service plans of the 1920s and 30s.  Roughly a third were constructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) from 1933 to 1942, working out of the Upper...
  • WPA Emergency Housing (former) - Bandon OR
    The Bandon Fire, which burned the majority of the town on September 26, 1936, displaced a number of the city's residents from their destroyed houses. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) promptly responded to a request for emergency housing by using WPA workers to construct 36 cottages. Despite the temporary nature of the original emergency housing, one still remains in the NE area of Bandon. While the demand for alternatives to the tent city that housed displaced residents was great, the emergency housing units were developed explicitly for those households on relief. Bandon residents who were employed were directed to the Federal...
  • Bandon History Museum (former Bandon City Hall) - Bandon OR
    Bandon's History Museum occupies a structure built by Work Progress Administration (WPA) workers to house the community's City Hall. After the destruction of the town in the Bandon Fire of September 26, 1936, priority was given to constructing a new base for the city's operation. As local historians note, the City Hall was one of the first buildings to be completed after the fire - second only to a local tavern. Construction began in October 1936 with WPA funds. It was completed in early January 1937 with a brief interruption of building activity to allow WPA workers to construct 36 temporary...
  • Jackson Park Improvements - Chicago IL
    In 1936, the Works Progress Administration (WPA) pursued a variety of improvements at Chicago’s historic Jackson Park.   “The WPA to town in the park,” the Jackson Park Advisory Council opines. WPA work crews built “comfort stations at the golf driving range,” a “children’s playground,” and “a maintenance building and an overpass at 63rd Street.” The WPA “shortened lagoon shoreline and did other rehabilitation work on Wooded Island and at the Japanese Garden. The 1888 ladies comfort station was rehabilitated.” Moreover, golf course “inlet bridges and the Perennial Garden” were installed. “As part of the WPA work, E.V. Buchsman design...
  • Glendale Steps - Akron OH
    The Works Progress Administration built the Glendale Steps in Akron, OH. Originally constructed to link the Walnut Street neighbourhood at the top of a 200' bluff near downtown Akron to Glendale Park at the base of the bluff. The site is currently under reclamation and restoration.
  • Potomac State College: Tree and Grass Planting – Keyser WV
    In April 1936, C.S. Liller, the janitor at Potomac State College (PSC), and three enrollees of the National Youth Administration (NYA), John Bright, Edward Furlong, and Joe Dickel, began planting larch and evergreen trees on the “Mineral Street slope of the Potomac Campus” (The Pasquino, April 24, 1936).  The president of the college, Joseph W. Stayman, contributed to the project, too, by driving the NYA men to Backbone Mountain to acquire more trees. Later in 1936, NYA students planted 15 sugar maple trees between the men’s and women’s dorms (Reynolds and Davis halls). This time, they were joined by Dr. Robert...
  • U.S. Federal Courthouse and Post Office (former) Murals - Cedar Rapids IA
    Once a U.S. Federal Courthouse & Post Office, the building at 101 S 1st St. in Cedar Rapids, Iowa now serves as the city hall. The courtroom is now the chambers for the city council, and is the location for four murals generated under the Treasury Relief Art Project between 1936-1937.
  • Honeyman State Park: Cleawox Picnic Area - Florence OR
    From 1936 to 1941, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) developed Honeyman State Park, just south of Florence, Oregon, under the supervision of the National Park Service (NPS).  The parkland had been purchased by the state from 1930 to 1936. Honeyman Park covers over 500 acres along Highway 101 (the Oregon Coast Highway), tucked behind the Oregon Dunes National Seashore.  It includes two freshwater lakes, Cleawox Lake within the dunes and the much larger Woahink Lake east of the highway. There is a day-use area on the north side of Cleawox Lake, a large campground south of that lake and water sports...
  • Missisquoi Bay Bridge (replaced) - Alburg to Swanton VT
    The federal Public Works Administration (PWA) provided a $214,363 grant for the construction of the original Missiquoi Bay Bridge connecting Alburgh and Swanton, Vermont. Approval for the project was given in January 1936. Construction began in June 1936 and was largely completed April 1938. The project's total cost was $559,145. The bridge replaced a ferry crossing near the location of its construction. The Brattleboro Reformer: "The bridge, it iss expected will, cross the bay at a point a short distance north of the present ferry crossing. It will consist of an 800-foot steel span in the center with approximately 4,200 feet...
  • South Seneca Central School - Ovid NY
    The South Seneca Central School building in Ovid, New York was constructed in 1937-8 with the assistance of federal Public Works Administration (PWA) funds. The PWA provided a $157,500 grant for the project, whose total cost was $358,496. PWA Docket No. NY 1503
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