• Tribal Hall of the Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians (Empire Community Hall) - Coos Bay OR
    Built in 1940-41 to serve as a multi-purpose community center for the Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians, this tribal hall is the last known intact New Deal Indian Community Building left in Oregon. Its funding came through the Works Projects Administration (WPA), the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934 (IRA), and the Indian Division of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC-ID). The hall was designed to support what was then an unorganized group of Indians in southwestern Oregon in addressing economic, social, health and political needs. The functional building provided an auditorium to seat 300, a kitchen for canning...
  • Trinity Park - Fort Worth TX
    Under WPA project 5771, the WPA made over $26,000 worth of improvements to the park in 1937. WPA work in the park included the Trinity Park Shelter, and most likely many other improvements as well.
  • Triplex Dwellings - Carlsbad National Park NM
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) constructed two triplex residences: NPS Building 25 and Building 28, in what is now known as the Carlsbad Caverns National Park Historic District. National Register of Historic Places nomination form, 1988: Multiple Dwelling Unit #1: NPS Bldg #25 A, B & C. Multiple Dwelling Unit #2, NPS Bldg #28 A, B & C. Two employee residence triplexes; site design by J.C. Miller in 1940; architectural design by Ken Saunders in 1940; design revisions by Lyle E. Bennett in 1942; patio and walk design by Harvey Cornell in 1941; all of NPS Regional Office in Santa Fe, New Mexico; built...
  • Truman State University: North Quad Improvements - Kirksville MO
    The north quad is still at the northernmost point of the Truman Sate University campus.  During the extensive construction that occurred during the 30’s, the north quad was renovated by landscape architects Hare & Hare from Kansas City.  The trees are now old and mature and the buildings continue to be used and are either being renovated or have undergone renovation.
  • Trumansburg Creek Improvements - Trumansburg NY
    The federal Work Projects Administration worked to improve Trumansburg Creek and surrounding land in Trumansburg, New York during the 1930s. One project, which cost $26,306 (of which the WPA contributed $17,466) was described by the WPA in its project rolls: "Improve Trumansburg Creek and surrounding park ... "including constructing retaining walls and wading pools, landscaping." Work occurred on both public and private property. On private lands the WPA improved "the creek bed and banks of creek."
  • Tucker Lake - Strawn TX
    Originally known as Strawn Lake, this 90-acre lake was constructed to supply water to the city of Strawn by damming Russell Creek. It was renamed Tucker Lake in honor of a mayor, and now is part of the recently created Palo Pinto State Park. ...November 23, 1936, Freese described his campaign to secure PWA financing for his firm's Texas clients: Today, I got Secretary Ickes' approval of Strawn ..." (Simon Freese, letter to Eunice Freese, November 23, 1936, as cited in Freese & Sizemore, undated).
  • Tuckermans Ravine - Gorham NH
    "Tuckerman Ravine is a glacial cirque sloping eastward on the southeast face of Mt. Washington, in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Although it draws hikers throughout the year, and skiers throughout the winter, it is best known for the many "spring skiers" who ascend it on foot and ski down the steep slope from early April into July." Wiki October 9, 1934: "…eight new ski trails, which will be open for the first time this season. Tuckerman Ravine Ski Trail is the major opus and showpiece of CCC activities carried on under the direction of the Federal and State forestry...
  • Tucson Mountain Park: Gates Pass Road & Overlook - Tucson AZ
    Tucson Mountain Park, created in 1929, was opened to general recreation use in the 1930s by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), working with the Pima County parks agency.  The northern half of the original park was added to the Saguaro National Monument in 1961, which became a national park in 1994, and this portion of the park was renamed Saguaro National Park – Tucson Mountain District (TMD). (See also Saguaro NP (TMD) project pages) The CCC 'boys' set up Camp Pima, SP6A, in December 1933 at the northwest corner of what was is now Saguaro NP.  Working from there, they carried out extensive...
  • Tucson Mountain Park: Improvements - Tucson AZ
    Tucson Mountain Park, created in 1929, was opened to general recreation use in the 1930s by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), working with the Pima County parks agency.  The northern half of the original park was added to the Saguaro National Monument in 1961, which became a national park in 1994, and this portion of the park was renamed Saguaro National Park – Tucson Mountain District (TMD). (See also Saguaro NP (TMD) project pages) The CCC 'boys' set up Camp Pima, SP6A, in December 1933 at the northwest corner of what was is now Saguaro NP.  Working from there, they carried out extensive...
  • Tucson Plant Materials Center - Tucson AZ
    "Public Works Administration funds financed construction of the Tucson Plant Materials Center. Hispanic workers hired with Federal Emergency Relief Administration funds made the adobe blocks. The eight original buildings at the center were later assembled by Civilian Conservation Corps enrollees between 1935 and 1941. Designed according to the Pueblo Revival style which imitates early southwestern Native American and Spanish architecture, the buildings were constructed with flat roofs, rounded corners, vigas (exposed wooden roof beams), and rough-carved, wooden porches. Today only two buildings, the administration and the general utility building, remain. The Tucson Plant Materials Center was one of 48 nurseries...
  • Tulare County Fairgrounds Improvements - Tulare CA
    The Tulare County Fairgrounds received extensive improvements from the WPA.
  • Tule Elk State Reserve - Buttonwillow CA
    This project involved the development of Tule Elk State Reserve, the construction of adobe warden's residence and a garage. In 1932 the state obtained 935 acres to establish a reserve for the preservation of the vanishing Tule elk. In 1934 the CCC Camp Wildlife Park was established under the Drought Relief Act, and CCC Company 1958 assigned to develop the reserve. The company built an adobe house as a staff residence and recreational facilities for park visitors, such as small adobe ramadas for shade, which were next to a small lake (Engbeck 2002).
  • Tulsa Fairgrounds Cafeteria - Tulsa OK
    The Works Progress Administration (WPA) created a site within the Tulsa Fairgrounds called the Tulsa Fairgrounds Cafeteria, which was finished during 1938. Currently, the cafeteria still remains standing. It has expanded many times since it was first built. Geographically, the Tulsa Fairgrounds Cafeteria spans just under less than one acre. The architecture of the cafeteria is unique. It was built upon an Art Deco style, and its foundation was brick. It’s a one-story rectangular shaped building that was surrounded by a running bond. The construction of this cafeteria was built to better serve the needs of those who attended the...
  • Tulsa Zoo Stone Cabin – Tulsa OK
    The refectory building at the Tulsa Zoological Garden was built by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in 1935. It was one of many New Deal projects undertaken in Oklahoma that “aimed to improve America’s public lands and parks” and “help lift the country out of the Great Depression.” The former refectory building has gone through many uses at the zoo and has recently been refurbished to serve as a public event space. “Originally designed as a refectory (gathering place to eat) this structure has served many purposes in its 86-year history. Once as a zoo entrance and concession area it also became...
  • Tumacácori National Historical Park: External Walls & Facilities - Tumacácori AZ
    The Tumacácori National Monument was set aside by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1908 to protect the ruins of the Mission of San Jose de Tumacacori.  In 1918, it came under the administration of the National Park Service and its regional 'custodian', Frank Pinkley.  Congress created the Tumacácori National Historic Park in 1990, adding the ruins of two nearby missions, Los Santos Angeles de Guevavi and San Cayetano de Calabazas. Under the park service's guidance, Tumacácori mission church and its dependencies were stabilized in 1920-21, but intentionally not fully restored.  Only with the aid of the New Deal did the park come...
  • Tumacácori National Historical Park: Gardens - Tumacácori AZ
    The Tumacácori National Monument was set aside by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1908 to protect the ruins of the Mission of San Jose de Tumacacori.  In 1918, it came under the administration of the National Park Service and its regional 'custodian', Frank Pinkley.  Congress created the Tumacácori National Historic Park in 1990, adding the ruins of two nearby missions, Los Santos Angeles de Guevavi and San Cayetano de Calabazas. Under the park service's guidance, Tumacácori mission church and its dependencies were stabilized in 1920-21, but intentionally not fully restored.  Only with the aid of the New Deal did the park come...
  • Tumacácori National Historical Park: Museum & Visitor Center - Tumacácori AZ
    The Tumacácori National Monument was set aside by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1908 to protect the ruins of the Mission of San Jose de Tumacacori.  In 1918, it came under the administration of the National Park Service and its regional 'custodian', Frank Pinkley.  Congress created the Tumacácori National Historic Park in 1990, adding the ruins of two nearby missions, Los Santos Angeles de Guevavi and San Cayetano de Calabazas. Under the park service's guidance, Tumacácori mission church and its dependencies were stabilized in 1920-21, but intentionally not restored.  Only with the aid of the New Deal did the park come to...
  • Tunnel in Great Smoky Mountains National Park - Townsend TN
    At peak enrollment, 4,300 workers from 23 Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) camps located in the Smoky Mountains constructed the roads, trails, bridges, campgrounds and structures of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The project was undertaken between 1933 and 1940.
  • Tunxis State Forest - Hartland CT
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC)'s Camp Robinson, which housed Company #180, was stationed at Tunxis State Forest in Hartland, Connecticut. The camp was established June 13, 1933 and was discontinued July 18, 1941. Among other projects independently listed on other pages, work included: "12 miles of truck trails including today's ... Hall Road, construction of a house for the Forest Ranger, and miles of cross-country ski trails." The ski cabin and ski trail remain today. Other improvements included access roads and a cross country ski loop trail.
  • Tuolumne Meadows Campground - Yosemite National Park CA
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) constructed the Tuolumne Meadows campground in 1933-34, according to a plan laid out by the National Park Service (NPS) and with financing from the Public Works Administration (PWA).  It is the largest campground in Yosemite National Park.  The campground regularized camping at Tuolumne, which had previously been a free-for-all with cars driving across the meadows and people camping wherever they liked. The damage to the meadows had been extensive before the National Park Service brought a halt to the anarchy. First, the NPS restricted camping to designated campgrounds and then implemented a new plan for individual campsites,...
  • Tuolumne Meadows Campground Comfort Stations - Yosemite National Park CA
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) constructed the Tuolumne Meadows campground in 1933-34.  It is the largest campground in Yosemite National Park. The CCC enrollees also built three comfort stations for the campground, done in classic National Park rustic style of boulders and timbers.  At the time, a comfort station was more than a restroom, because it included washing facilities. The three comfort stations still operate and have been placed on the National Register of Historic Places.    
  • Tuolumne Meadows Campground Contact Station - Yosemite National Park CA
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) constructed the Tuolumne Meadows campground in 1933-34 and added a "contact station" or entrance station in 1936. The building is done is classic National Park rustic style, with massive boulder walls. An entrance kiosk has been added to the campground in recent years.  
  • Tuolumne Meadows Sewage System - Yosemite National Park CA
    In the late 1930s, the Public Works Administration (PWA) funded a new sewage collection and treatment system for Tuolumne Meadows.  It replaced the original septic tanks for the campground comfort stations and was extended to take in a broader area around the campground. More information is needed on the amount and timing of the PWA funding. The old spray field system for distributing treated sewage has been recently replaced with settling ponds. It is unknown how much of the original piping survives.
  • Tuolumne Meadows Visitor Center (former) - Yosemite National Park CA
    The Tuolumne Meadows Visitors Center was originally built by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) as a road crew camp mess hall in 1934.  Around 1980,  the National Park Service converted the building to a Visitors Center, replacing an older one in the original "contact station" at Tuolumne Meadows campground. This building is a good example of National Park Service rustic park architecture of the 1930's. It was constructed with native materials to blend with the environment, and reflects hand crafted techniques. It is on the National Register of Historic Places. As of 2022, a new Visitors Center is under construction nearby and...
  • Turkey Creek Dams and Fish Pools - Comanche County OK
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) impounded Turkey Creek with three dams, creating fish pools, just north of the creek's confluence with West Cache Creek. The collective area of the lakes was about two acres.
  • Turkey Run State Park Picnic Shelter - Marshall IN
    The picnic shelter, commonly known as Big Log Shelter, was completed in 1936. It was started as a Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) project but was abandoned in 1935. The building was then completed by the Works Progress Administration (WPA). The shelter has three fireplaces and is classified as parks rustic.
  • Turkey Run State Park - Marshall IN
    "Shelter houses, a saddle barn and many sandstone trail structures are the legacy of the hard working young men of the Civilian Conservation Corps, Camp 8, stationed at Turkey Run in 1934-1935."
  • Turkey Run State Park Cabins - Marshall IN
    Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers completed five identical cabins in 1941. The cabins sit in a semi-circle in a lightly wooded area.
  • Turkey Run State Park Canyon Shelter - Marshall IN
    The Canyon shelter was completed by Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers in 1935. The style of the shelter is classified as parks rustic.
  • Turkey Run State Park Commissary - Marshall IN
    Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Co. 2580 began construction on the commissary. The CCC Camp was abandoned in March 1942 and the commissary was only seventy percent complete. The commissary was eventually completed by park personnel and opened to the public later that year. The commissary is now used as a nature center.
  • Turkey Run State Park Gatehouse - Marshall IN
    Using a variety of native materials, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) built gatehouses designed to appeal to the eye and draw in visitors with hints of the delights of nature within the park. CCC workers completed Turkey Run's gatehouse in 1935. The style of the gatehouse is classified as parks rustic.
  • Turkey Run State Park Oven Shelter - Marshall IN
    The oven shelter, commonly known as Fireplace Shelter, was completed by Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) laborers in 1935. The style of the oven shelter is classified as parks rustic.
  • Turkey Run State Park Over Shelter - Marshall IN
    The oven shelter, known as the Newby Culch Shelter House, was completed by Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) laborers in 1935. The shelter was constructed from stone and wood. The style of the shelter is classified as parks rustic.
  • Turkey Run State Park Picnic Shelter - Marshall IN
    The picnic shelter, commonly known as Middle Shelter, was completed by Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers in 1935. The style of the shelter is classified as parks rustic.
  • Turkey Run State Park Saddle Barn - Marshall IN
    Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) laborers completed the saddle barn in 1940. The style of the barn is classified as parks rustic. The barn was constructed with stone and wood.
  • Turkey Run State Park Service Building - Marshall IN
    Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) laborers completed the service building in 1935. The service building is located near the park's office and remains functional. The style of the service building is classified as parks rustic.
  • Turkey Run State Park Shelter House - Marshall IN
    The shelter house is known today as the Tennis Court Shelter House. It was completed by Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) laborers in 1935.
  • Turkey Run State Park Sunset Point - Marshall IN
    Sunset Point was completed by Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) laborers in 1935. The style of the decorative stone is classified as parks rustic. The stone wall overlooks Sugar Creek. Sunset Point is a good example of stone work completed throughout the park trails by CCC, consisting primarily of walls, steps, and bridges.
  • Turkey Thicket Recreation Center Tennis Courts - Washington DC
    Works Progress Administration (WPA) project cards at the National Archives show that the WPA was charged with another round of improvement of recreational facilities in the city of Washington, DC in the early 1940s.  This followed on a major program of parks improvement by the WPA in 1935-36. The approved works included: building tennis courts at Palisades Playground, Edgewood Playground, and Reservation "C" on the Mall; grading, filling, and constructing tennis courts at Turkey Thicket playground; excavating cinders from west parking area and surfacing east parking lot at Takoma Recreation Center; spreading topsoil on south field at Banneker Recreation Center; and...
  • Turner Dam and Reservoir - East Providence RI
    James V. Turner Reservoir in East Providence, Rhode Island (with spillover into Seekonk, Massachusetts) was constructed with the aid of federal Public Works Administration (PWA) funds. "Turner Reservoir was created in 1935 with the building of the Turner Dam, which the City of East Providence used for their drinking supply until the 1960s. Turner Reservoir is now open to the public for recreation." (ExploreRI.org) The PWA supplied a $178,000 loan and $66,781 grant; the total cost of the project was $245,608. Work occurred between May 1934 and June 1935. (PWA Docket No. RI 2003)