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  • Abbeville Museum Mural - Abbeville LA
    This mural "The Harvest" was originally painted for what was then the Abbeville post office by Louis Raynaud in 1939. Presently, it hangs in the Abbeville Museum downtown. "The Harvest shows men and women harvesting cotton, sugarcane, and muskrat hides.  Men gather cotton and tend the cane.  A couple prepares hides for drying.  Two male children do what children have always done when they were not pressed into premature labor to support mill families or sit for younger siblings-they hang around.  A man prepares to cut a clump of cane, and one woman waits, holding a bucket of water for the...
  • Algona Public Library Mural - Algona IA
    The mural "Daily Bread" -- currently on display at the Algona Public Library -- was completed with New Deal funds in 1941. The painting by Francis Robert White, formerly in the Algona Iowa post office, moved to the Algona Public Library. When the library was being remodeled, the mural was relocated to the Algona City Hall, where it is on display in the Algona city council chambers. City Hall is located at 112 W. Call Street, Algona, IA 50511.
  • Apponaug Post Office Murals - Warwick RI
    Completed in 1942, this mural “Apponaug Fishermen” by artist Paul Sample depicts local shellfishers in Apponaug Cove. It resides in the Apponaug Post Office, dedicated in 1940.
  • ASU Museum Mural - Jonesboro AR
    H. Louis Freund painted this 13' x 4'8" oil on canvas mural "Early Days and First Post Office in Pocahontas" in 1939 for the Treasury Section of Fine Arts for the post office in Pocahontas. After years of damage, it was restored and transported to ASU. "The mural depicts several early scenes of Pocahontas and the surrounding areas. In the lower right is the community of Davidsonville, where the state's first post office was established in 1817. On the left is the old dam and mill as it existed around 1835 in the community of Birdell on the Eleven Point River....
  • Augusta Museum Visitor's Center Mural - Augusta GA
    Arnold Friedman painted this oil on canvas mural, entitled "Environs of Warrentown," in 1940 with funds provided by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts. It was originally installed in the Warrentown post office but was removed in the early 1980's because of complaints about the mural's subject matter.
  • Barrow County Museum Bas Relief - Winder GA
    Marion Sanford completed this plaster bas relief, entitled "Weighing Cotton," in 1939 with funds provided by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts in what was originally the Winder post office. It is viewable in the Exhibit Room of the Barrow County Museum.
  • Baytown Historical Museum Mural - Baytown TX
    The historic Baytown Historical Museum building (formerly Federal Building / post office) houses an example of New Deal artwork: "Texas," a fresco mural by Barse Miller. The mural was commissioned by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts. It was restored in 2011 at a cost of $14,000.
  • Beech River Heritage Museum (Old Post Office) Mural - Lexington TN
    This oil-on-canvas mural by Grace Greenwood, entitled "The Progress of Power," was commissioned by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts and completed in 1940. It is housed in the Beech River Heritage Museum, which is the former post office.
  • Belden Station Post Office Mural - Norwalk CT
    The Section of Fine Arts mural entitled "Building Norwalk" was painted in 1938 by Arnold Blanch for the Belden Station post office in Norwalk, Connecticut.
  • Berea Police and Municipal Center (Old Post Office) Mural - Berea KY
    Frank W. Long completed this tempera-on-plaster mural, entitled "Berea Commencement in the Old Days," in 1940 with funds provided by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts. It is viewable in the lobby of the Berea Police and Municipal Center (itself a New Deal building), which was originally constructed as Berea's post office.
  • Bethesda-Chevy Chase Regional Services Center: Gates Mural - Bethesda MD
    Robert F. Gates painted the mural, "Montgomery County Farm Women's Market," in 1939 for the Bethesda post office, which was closed in 2012. It shows a woman feeding animals next to women selling produce at the Farm Women’s Market, which opened on Wisconsin Avenue in 1932.   The mural was commissioned by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts. Robert Gates later became head of the Art Department at American University. In 1938, Eleanor Roosevelt visited the Procurement Division of the Treasury Department to look at the sketches of the Gates mural. She later wrote in her diary the sketch was “charming,” and “I think...
  • Birch Bayh Federal Building Friezes - Indianapolis IN
    The Birch Bayh Federal Building annex (the rear portion of the building, toward E. New York St.) features two vehicular entrances—one at the northeast and one at the northwest corner of the building. They are capped by identical limestone friezes, titled "Distribution of the Mail." Visitors' Guide: "In 1939, Herron School of Art instructor David K. Rubins carved the limestone spandrels and keystones over the driveway entrance arches on the 1938 North Addition. He carved them in place. Mr. Rubins is also known for creating the statue of Young Abe Lincoln, which sits on the Indiana State House lawn, and the bronze cherub...
  • Bob Casey Federal Building and Courthouse Mural - Houston TX
    "Houston Ship Canal--Loading Oil" Medium: oil on canvas Size: 6'6" x 6'6"
  • Broad Ripple Station Post Office Mural - Indianapolis IN
    "Suburban Street" is a 1942 Section of Fine Arts mural entitled "Suburban Street" by Alan Tompkins. The size of the mural is 11'9" x 5'2" and the medium is oil on canvas. The work is installed in Indianapolis's historic Broad Ripple Station post office.
  • Bronx General Post Office Murals - Bronx NY
    The Bronx General Post Office houses a set of 13 magnificent mural panels—collectively titled "Resources of America"— by Ben Shahn and Bernarda Bryson Shahn. A Lehman College Guide to Public Art in the Bronx has this to say about the Shahn murals: "In the fall of 1938 Ben Shahn, assisted by his wife Bernarda Bryson Shahn, began work on the cartoons for a major cycle of thirteen egg tempera on plaster frescos for the Bronx General Post Office. The project was created under the US Treasury Section of Painting and Sculpture, a new deal art program which produced public works in federal...
  • Bronx General Post Office: Kreis Sculpture - Bronx NY
    The Bronx General Post Office contains superb examples of New Deal art, added in 1938-39 under the Treasure Section of Fine Arts program.  Inside are 13 mural panels by Ben Shahn and his wife, Bernarda;  on the exterior wall, flanking the entrance, are  two limestone sculptures by Charles Rudy and Henry Kreis.  On the left, as one faces the building, is "Noah" by Rudy; on the right, "The Letter" by Kreis. A Guide to Public Art in the Bronx from Lehman College has this to add: " The awards, announced by the Treasury Department, were made unanimously by the judges, Paul Manship, Edward McCartan and Maurice Sterne, sculptors, and...
  • Bronx General Post Office: Rudy Sculpture - Bronx NY
    The Bronx General Post Office contains superb examples of New Deal art, added in 1938-39 under the Treasure Section of Fine Arts program.  Inside are 13 mural panels by Ben Shahn and his wife, Bernarda;  on the exterior wall, flanking the entrance, are  two limestone sculptures by Charles Rudy and Henry Kreis.  On the left, as one faces the building, is "Noah" by Rudy; on the right, "The Letter" by Kreis. A Guide to Public Art in the Bronx from Lehman College has this to add: " The awards, announced by the Treasury Department, were made unanimously by the judges, Paul Manship, Edward McCartan and Maurice Sterne, sculptors, and...
  • Burleson County Courthouse Mural - Caldwell TX
    The mural "Indians Moving" by Suzanne Scheuer was painted for the historic former Caldwell post office building, with funding from the Treasury Section of Fine Arts. It was later relocated to the Burleson County Courthouse.
  • Canal Street Station Post Office Sculpture - New York NY
    The federal Treasury Department's Section of Fine Arts funded a terra-cotta relief by Wheeler Williams entitled "Indian Bowman" to be installed in the newly constructed Canal Street post office. The sculpture was installed in 1938.
  • Carl C. Mose Sculptures - Salina KS
    These New Deal statues entitled "Communication" and "Land" were installed by Carl C. Mose in 1940 in what was then the Salina Post Office and Courthouse. The sculptures still decorate the original building which is now the Smoky Hill Museum.
  • Chamber of Commerce Mural - Hartselle AL
    The mural "Cotton Scene" was painted for then-new Hartselle post office by Lee R. Warthen in 1941. The work was commissioned by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts. “Warthen, of Washington, D.C., produced the Hartselle panel as the result of his entry into the War Department Building Competition. Warthen did extensive research for the panel, wrote the local postmaster, and talked with U.S. House member John Sparkman, who was from Hartselle, about the local industry and activities used in the final panel.” (https://www.alabamamoments.alabama.gov/sec49det.html) In the late 1970s, the mural was moved to its current location at the Hartselle Chamber of Commerce office in...
  • Charles E. Simons, Jr. Federal Court House Mural - Aiken SC
    The courthouse contains a 1938 Section of Fine Arts mural by Stefan Hirsch entitled “Justice as Protector and Avenger.” During the 1930s, this mural sparked an intensely racialized controversy: "The central female figure is a reference to the Renaissance Virtue Justice—familiar to us all because she is regularly deployed in courthouses around the world. But the WPA artist explained that his 'figure of "Justice"' was 'without any of the customary . . . symbolic representations (scale, sword, book . . .).' He said that the only 'allegory' he had permitted himself was 'to use the red, white and blue for...
  • City Hall (old Post Office) Mural - Belmont NC
    The historic Belmont City Hall, constructed as the city's post office, houses an example of New Deal artwork. The mural "Mayor Chronicle's South Fork Boys" was completed by Peter DeAnna in 1940; the work was commissioned by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts.
  • City Hall (Old Post Office) Mural - Snohomish WA
    This 1940 Section of Fine Arts oil-on-canvas mural by Lance W. Hart, "Construction of a Skid Road in the 80's," was painted for what was then the Snohomish post office. The mural remains in the original location, which is now the Snohomish city hall. “Artists like Hart were required to submit a series of sketches or designs for their murals before final approval. To see a sketch of “Construction of a Skid Road” that is housed in the National Archives, click here.” (depts.washington.edu)
  • City Hall (Old Post Office) Mural - Tillamook OR
    Titled "Captain Gray Entering Tillamook Bay," this mural depicts Captain Gray, who is best known for discovery of the Columbia River in the year 1792. Four years prior to that, however, he became the first white man, on record, to set foot on Oregon’s shore. On the same voyage, he was the first to carry the American flag around the world. Residents of Tillamook County find special interest in the log of his visit. The log tells of the four days spent in what is now Tillamook Bay. He believed he had discovered the “Great River of the West,” something...
  • City Hall Mural - Fort Pierce FL
    Fort Pierce, Florida's City Hall contains an example of New Deal artwork: a Section of Fine Arts-commissioned mural entitled "Osceola Holding Informal Court with His Chiefs." The work, which was completed in 1938, was originally displayed in the town's historic post office building.
  • City Hall Mural - Reidsville NC
    The mural "Tobacco," which hangs in the finance office in Reidsville's City Hall was painted by Gordon Samstag with Treasury Section of Fine Arts funds. The building was formerly the city's post office.
  • City Hall Mural - Rome NY
    Wendell Jones painted the oil-on-canvas mural "Barn Raising" in 1942 for the Treasury Section of Fine Arts. Originally painted for the city's then-new post office, the mural is currently viewable in the lobby of Rome's City Hall.
  • City Hall Reliefs - Alexander City AL
    Three terra cotta reliefs funded by the Treasury Department's Section of Fine Arts. "Cotton," "Tobacco," and "Wheat" were created by Franc Epping in 1941 and installed in what was then the Alexander City post office at 82 Court Sq. That building has since been turned into a community center, and all three pieces are now in storage in City Hall. There are plans to restore them and install them in the city library.
  • City Hall Sculptures - Kansas City MO
    Artist Carl Paul Jennewein created a series of fountains flanking the walkway to the PWA city hall entrance, descending to the south away from the city hall with a winged horse followed by shells and fantastical creatures. C. Paul Jennewein, Ulric Ellerhusen, and Walker Hancock also carved a series of 16 bas relief friezes surrounding the Kansas City Hall depicting the history and people of Kansas City Paul Jennewein was born In Stuttgart and immigrated to the United States in 1907, apprenticed with Buhler and Lauter, studying at the Art Students League of New York at night. Although he worked as a...
  • Clifton Recreation Center Murals - Clifton NJ
    Then the main post office for Clifton, New Jersey (and later known as Clifton's Main Avenue Station post office), what is now the Clifton Recreation Center received a six-panel oil-on-canvas mural titled "Transportation". John Sitton was awarded the contract for the development, painting, and installation of the murals through a National Competition, for which he was awarded $1,700. Further details can be found on the contract dated October 19, 1936 (see image). The murals were installed at the end of 1937. Clifton Postmaster G. A. Keenan pleaded for two additional murals to be painted around the office lobby, but further funds were...
  • Clinton City Hall Mural - Clinton OK
    Loren Mozley painted this mural "Race for Land" in 1938 for the Treasury Section of Fine Arts. It currently hangs in the City Council chambers.
  • Clinton Federal Building: Brook Murals - Washington DC
    The Clinton Federal Building (north) was originally the US Post Office Department headquarters, completed under the New Deal in 1934.  It contains a wealth of New Deal artworks commissioned and paid for by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts: 25 murals and 22 sculptural elements (12 bas-reliefs, 2 statues, 8 wood medallions). Alexander Brook painted two murals, "Writing the Family Letter" and "Reading the Letter".  The letter is from the family of a Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) recruit to the young man in his camp and is meant to show  "the mail's role in helping to alleviate the loneliness and homesickness...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Calder Sculpture - Washington DC
    Alexander Stirling Calder was commissioned by the New Deal’s Treasury Section of Fine Arts to create the sculpture “Continental Post Rider, 1775-1789.” The sculpture was made out of an aluminum alloy, and Calder was paid $3,000 for the job. When this artwork was created, the present-day Clinton Federal Building was the headquarters of the U.S. Post Office Department. The Treasury Section of Fine Arts existed from 1934 to 1943. It was initially called the “Treasury Section of Painting and Sculpture”; then the “Treasury Section of Fine Arts”; and finally just “Section of Fine Arts” when it was moved under the jurisdiction...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Cecere Sculpture - Washington DC
    Gaetano Cecere was commissioned by the New Deal’s Treasury Section of Fine Arts to create the sculpture “Rural Free Delivery Mail Carrier.” The sculpture was made out of an aluminum alloy, and Cecere was paid $3,000 for the job. When this artwork was created, the present-day Clinton Federal Building was the headquarters of the U.S. Post Office Department. The Treasury Section of Fine Arts existed from 1934 to 1943. It was initially called the “Treasury Section of Painting and Sculpture”; then the “Treasury Section of Fine Arts”; and finally just “Section of Fine Arts” when it was moved under the jurisdiction...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Crimi Murals - Washington DC
    The Clinton Federal Building (north) was originally the US Post Office Department headquarters, completed under the New Deal in 1934.  It contains a wealth of New Deal artworks commissioned and paid for by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts: 25 murals and 22 sculptural elements (12 bas-reliefs, 2 statues, 8 wood medallions). Alfred D. Crimi painted two large (7' x 13.5') frescoes for the Post Office building in 1937: "Transportation of Mail" and "Post Office Work Room".  They are located on the 4th floor of the south wing of the building. Sarah Gordon notes that: "Crimi, an experienced fresco painter who trained in...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Derujinksy Sculptures - Washington DC
    Gleb Derujinksy was commissioned by the New Deal’s Treasury Section of Fine Arts to create eight sculptures of previous Postmasters General. The sculptures were made out of wood, and Derujinsky was paid $2,800 for the job. When this artwork was created, the present-day Clinton Federal Building was the headquarters of the U.S. Post Office Department. The Treasury Section of Fine Arts existed from 1934 to 1943. It was initially called the “Treasury Section of Painting and Sculpture”; then the “Treasury Section of Fine Arts”; and finally just “Section of Fine Arts” when it was moved under the jurisdiction of the newly-created...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Free Murals - Washington DC
    The Clinton Federal Building (north) was originally the US Post Office Department headquarters, completed under the New Deal in 1934.  It contains a wealth of New Deal artworks commissioned and paid for by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts – 25 murals and 22 sculptural elements (12 bas-reliefs, 2 statues, 8 wood medallions) – featuring postal themes. Karl Free painted two large (7' x 13.5') murals for the former Post Office Building: "French Hugenots in Florida" and "Arrival of Mail in New Amsterdam".  Painted in 1938, they are located on the 7th floor of the south wing of the building. The building...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Gross Sculpture - Washington DC
    Chaim Gross was commissioned by the New Deal’s Treasury Section of Fine Arts to create the sculpture “Alaska Snowshoe Mail Carrier.” It is made out of an aluminum alloy, and Gross was paid $3,000 for the job. When this artwork was created, the present-day Clinton Federal Building was the headquarters of the U.S. Post Office Department. The Treasury Section of Fine Arts existed from 1934 to 1943. It was initially called the “Treasury Section of Painting and Sculpture”; then the “Treasury Section of Fine Arts”; and finally just “Section of Fine Arts” when it was moved under the jurisdiction of the...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Harding Murals - Washington DC
    The Clinton Federal Building (north) was originally the US Post Office Department headquarters, completed under the New Deal in 1934.  It contains a wealth of New Deal artworks commissioned and paid for by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts – 25 murals and 22 sculptural elements (12 bas-reliefs, 2 statues, 8 wood medallions) – featuring postal themes. George Harding painted two large (6.5' x 13.5') murals for the former Post Office Building:  "Post Dispatch Rider" and "Ben Franklin, Colonial Postmaster" (1938). Gordon comments that, "George Matthews Harding was born, raised, and educated in Philadelphia and developed an early interest in the founding fathers,...
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