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  • Clinton Federal Building: Kent Murals - Washington DC
    The Clinton Federal Building (north) was originally the US Post Office Department headquarters, completed under the New Deal in 1934.  It contains a wealth of New Deal artworks commissioned and paid for by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts – 25 murals and 22 sculptural elements (12 bas-reliefs, 2 statues, 8 wood medallions) – featuring postal themes. Rockwell Kent painted two large (7' x 13.5') murals for the Post Office building:  "Mail Service in the Tropics" and "Mail Service in the Arctic"  (1937).   At the time, Alaska and Puerto Rico represented the northernmost and southernmost territories serviced by the U.S. Post Office...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Kirishjian Murals - Washington DC
    The Clinton Federal Building (north) was originally the US Post Office Department headquarters, completed under the New Deal in 1934.  It contains a wealth of New Deal artworks commissioned and paid for by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts – 25 murals and 22 sculptural elements (12 bas-reliefs, 2 statues, 8 wood medallions) – featuring postal themes. In 1940, Vahe Kirishjian painted 8 ceiling panels for the Law Library in the Post Office Department, four large (13 x 21') and four smaller, called "The Four Seasons and Signs of the Zodiac." The Kirishjian murals cover the ceiling of the Law Library. The Clinton...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Lee Murals - Washington DC
    The Clinton Federal Building (north) was originally the US Post Office Department headquarters, completed under the New Deal in 1934.  It contains a wealth of New Deal artworks commissioned and paid for by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts: 25 murals and 22 sculptural elements (12 bas-reliefs, 2 statues, 8 wood medallions). Most are on postal themes. Doris Lee painted two large (6' x 13.5') murals for the Post Office Department on the theme of "The Development of the Post in the Country." The two were painted in 1938 and titled, "Country Post" and "General Store."   They hang in the...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Lee Sculpture - Washington DC
    Arthur Lee was commissioned by the New Deal’s Treasury Section of Fine Arts to create the sculpture “Pony Express Mail Carrier, 1860-1861.” The sculpture was made out of an aluminum alloy, and Lee was paid $3,000 for the job. When this artwork was created, the present-day Clinton Federal Building was the headquarters of the U.S. Post Office Department. The Treasury Section of Fine Arts existed from 1934 to 1943. It was initially called the “Treasury Section of Painting and Sculpture”; then the “Treasury Section of Fine Arts”; and finally just “Section of Fine Arts” when it was moved under the jurisdiction...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Lockwood Murals - Washington DC
    The Clinton Federal Building (north) was originally the US Post Office Department headquarters, completed under the New Deal in 1934.  It contains a wealth of New Deal artworks commissioned and paid for by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts – 25 murals and 22 sculptural elements (12 bas-reliefs, 2 statues, 8 wood medallions) – featuring postal themes. Ward Lockwood painted two large (6' x 13.5') murals for the former Post Office Building: "Opening of the Southwest" and "Consolidation of the West" (1937).  These reflect conventional American thinking in the 1930s about the conquest of the west as a peaceful process of...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Maldarelli Sculpture - Washington DC
    Oronzio Maldarelli was commissioned by the New Deal’s Treasury Section of Fine Arts to create the sculpture “Airmail Pilot.” It is made out of an aluminum alloy, and Maldarelli was paid $3,000 for the job. When this artwork was created, the present-day Clinton Federal Building was the headquarters of the U.S. Post Office Department. The Treasury Section of Fine Arts existed from 1934 to 1943. It was initially called the “Treasury Section of Painting and Sculpture”; then the “Treasury Section of Fine Arts”; and finally just “Section of Fine Arts” when it was moved under the jurisdiction of the newly-created Public...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Margoulies Sculpture - Washington DC
    Berta Margoulies was commissioned by the New Deal’s Treasury Section of Fine Arts to create the sculpture “Colonial Foot Postman, 1691-1775.” The sculpture was made out of an aluminum alloy, and Margoulies was paid $3,000 for the job. When this artwork was created, the present-day Clinton Federal Building was the headquarters of the U.S. Post Office Department. The Treasury Section of Fine Arts existed from 1934 to 1943. It was initially called the “Treasury Section of Painting and Sculpture”; then the “Treasury Section of Fine Arts”; and finally just “Section of Fine Arts” when it was moved under the jurisdiction of...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Marsh Murals - Washington DC
    The Clinton Federal Building (north) was originally the US Post Office Department headquarters, completed under the New Deal in 1934.  It contains a wealth of New Deal artworks commissioned and paid for by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts – 25 murals and 22 sculptural elements (12 bas-reliefs, 2 statues, 8 wood medallions) – featuring postal themes. Reginald Marsh painted two large (6'7" x 12'6") murals for the Post Office building:  "Sorting the Mail" and "Unloading the Mail" (1936).   The Marsh murals hang in the 4th floor of the north wing of the Clinton building. The building is presently occupied by the Environmental...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Mechau Murals - Washington DC
    The Clinton Federal Building (north) was originally the US Post Office Department headquarters, completed under the New Deal in 1934.  It contains a wealth of New Deal artworks commissioned and paid for by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts – 25 murals and 22 sculptural elements (12 bas-reliefs, 2 statues, 8 wood medallions) – featuring postal themes. In 1937, Frank Mechau painted two large (7 x 13') oil-on-canvas murals for the former Post Office Department Building: "Dangers of the Mail" and "Pony Express."  They are notable both for their stylistic daring and their controversial subject matter, and they have evoked praise...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Palmer Murals - Washington DC
    The Clinton Federal Building (north) was originally the US Post Office Department headquarters, completed under the New Deal in 1934.  It contains a wealth of New Deal artworks commissioned and paid for by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts – 25 murals and 22 sculptural elements (12 bas-reliefs, 2 statues, 8 wood medallions) – featuring postal themes. William C. Palmer painted two large (7' x 13.5') murals for the Post Office Building: "Covered Wagon Attacked by Indians" and "Mail Coach Attacked by Bandits" (1937). It must be said that Palmer's idea of the Wild West was standard popular mythology and the...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Piccirilli Sculpture - Washington DC
    Attilio Piccirilli was commissioned by the New Deal’s Treasury Section of Fine Arts to create the sculpture “Contemporary Postman.” The sculpture was made out of an aluminum alloy, and Piccirilli was paid $3,000 for the job. When this artwork was created, the present-day Clinton Federal Building was the headquarters of the U.S. Post Office Department. The Treasury Section of Fine Arts existed from 1934 to 1943. It was initially called the “Treasury Section of Painting and Sculpture”; then the “Treasury Section of Fine Arts”; and finally just “Section of Fine Arts” when it was moved under the jurisdiction of the newly-created...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Reliefs and Sculptures - Washington DC
    The William Jefferson Clinton Federal Building, originally the US Post Office Department, was begun under the Hoover Administration and completed under the New Deal in 1934.  It is richly decorated with New Deal artworks paid for by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts. There are 25 murals and 22 sculptural elements: 12 bas-reliefs, 2 statues, and 8 carved wood medallions. The building serves today as the headquarters for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).  It includes a local branch post office, called Benjamin Franklin Station, on Pennsylvania Avenue, that is open to the public; but entry to the rest of the building...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Savage Murals - Washington DC
    The Clinton Federal Building (north) was originally the US Post Office Department headquarters, completed under the New Deal in 1934.  It contains a wealth of New Deal artworks commissioned and paid for by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts – 25 murals and 22 sculptural elements (12 bas-reliefs, 2 statues, 8 wood medallions) – featuring postal themes. Eugene Francis Savage painted two large (7 x 13.5') murals for the Post Office Department building:  "Carrier of News and Knowledge" and "Messenger of Sympathy and Love".  The works were painted in 1937. Sarah Gordon says of these murals: "As the culmination of the U.S. Post...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Scaravaglione Sculpture - Washington DC
    Concetta Maria Scaravaglione was commissioned by the New Deal’s Treasury Section of Fine Arts to create the sculpture “Railway Mail Carrier, 1862.” The sculpture was made out of an aluminum alloy, and Scaravaglione was paid $3,000 for the job. When this artwork was created, the present-day Clinton Federal Building was the headquarters of the U.S. Post Office Department. The Treasury Section of Fine Arts existed from 1934 to 1943. It was initially called the “Treasury Section of Painting and Sculpture”; then the “Treasury Section of Fine Arts”; and finally just “Section of Fine Arts” when it was moved under the jurisdiction...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Schmitz Sculpture - Washington DC
    Carl Ludwig Schmitz was commissioned by the New Deal’s Treasury Section of Fine Arts to create the sculpture “City Delivery Carrier, 1863.” The sculpture was made out of an aluminum alloy, and Schmitz was paid $3,000 for the job. When this artwork was created, the present-day Clinton Federal Building was the headquarters of the U.S. Post Office Department. The Treasury Section of Fine Arts existed from 1934 to 1943. It was initially called the “Treasury Section of Painting and Sculpture”; then the “Treasury Section of Fine Arts”; and finally just “Section of Fine Arts” when it was moved under the jurisdiction...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Warneke Sculpture - Washington DC
    Heinz Warneke was commissioned by the New Deal’s Treasury Section of Fine Arts to create the sculpture “Express Mail Carrier.” The sculpture was made out of an aluminum alloy, and Warneke was paid $3,000 for the job. When this artwork was created, the present-day Clinton Federal Building was the headquarters of the U.S. Post Office Department. The Treasury Section of Fine Arts existed from 1934 to 1943. It was initially called the “Treasury Section of Painting and Sculpture”; then the “Treasury Section of Fine Arts”; and finally just “Section of Fine Arts” when it was moved under the jurisdiction of the...
  • Clinton Federal Building: Waugh Sculpture - Washington DC
    Sidney Biehler Waugh was commissioned by the New Deal’s Treasury Section of Fine Arts to create the sculpture “U.S. Post Stage Driver, 1789-1836.” The sculpture was made out of an aluminum alloy, and Waugh was paid $3,000 for the job. When this artwork was created, the present-day Clinton Federal Building was the headquarters of the U.S. Post Office Department. The Treasury Section of Fine Arts existed from 1934 to 1943. It was initially called the “Treasury Section of Painting and Sculpture”; then the “Treasury Section of Fine Arts”; and finally just “Section of Fine Arts” when it was moved under the...
  • Cohen Federal Building: Barthé Sculpture - Washington DC
    The Wilbur J. Cohen building, originally built for the Social Security Administration in 1938-1940, is home to a magnificent collection of social security themed artworks funded by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts. One of the artworks is a sculpture, "American Eagle," by noted African American artist and sculptor, Richmond Barthé (1940). The Social Security Administration never occupied the building, which was turned over to the War Department in 1941.  After the war, the Federal Security Agency (FSA), under which the Social Security Board had been placed in 1939, moved into the building. In 1953, the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, succeeded...
  • Cohen Federal Building: Davis Reliefs - Washington DC
    The Wilbur J. Cohen building, originally built for the Social Security Administration in 1938-1940, is home to a magnificent collection of social security themed artworks funded by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts. Two of the artworks are exterior bas-reliefs over entrances by Emma Lou Davis, "Family Group" and "Unemployment Compensation" (1941). The Social Security Administration never occupied the building, which was turned over to the War Department in 1941.  After the war, the Federal Security Agency (FSA), under which the Social Security Board had been placed in 1939, moved into the building. In 1953, the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, succeeded the...
  • Cohen Federal Building: Fogel Murals - Washington DC
    The Wilbur J. Cohen building, originally built for the Social Security Administration in 1938-1940, is home to many social security themed artworks funded by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts. Two of the artworks are murals by Seymour Fogel, "Wealth of the Nation" and "Security of the People," painted in 1938 and installed in 1942 in the lobby at Independence Avenue entrance. The Social Security Administration never occupied the building, which was turned over to the War Department in 1941.  After the war, the Federal Security Agency (FSA), under which the Social Security Board had been placed in 1939, moved into the building. In...
  • Cohen Federal Building: Guston Fresco - Washington DC
    The Wilbur J. Cohen building, originally built for the Social Security Administration in 1938-1940, is home to a magnificent collection of social security themed artworks funded by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts. One of the artworks is a large fresco stage curtain in the auditorium by Philip Guston, "Reconstruction and Well-Being of the Family" (1942). The Social Security Administration never occupied the building, which was turned over to the War Department in 1941.  After the war, the Federal Security Agency (FSA), under which the Social Security Board had been placed in 1939, moved into the building. In 1953, the Department of Health,...
  • Cohen Federal Building: Kreis Reliefs - Washington DC
    The Wilbur J. Cohen building, originally built for the Social Security Administration in 1938-1940, is home to a magnificent collection of social security themed artworks funded by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts. Two of the artworks are exterior bas-reliefs over the entrances by Henry Kreis, "The Growth of Social Security" and "The Benefits of Social Security" (1941). The Social Security Administration never occupied the building, which was turned over to the War Department in 1941.  After the war, the Federal Security Agency (FSA), under which the Social Security Board had been placed in 1939, moved into the building. In 1953, the Department...
  • Cohen Federal Building: Other Murals - Washington DC
    The Wilbur J. Cohen building, originally built for the Social Security Administration in 1938-1940, is home to a magnificent collection of social security themed artworks funded by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts. One of the lesser-known artworks is a mural by Jenne and Ethel Magafan, "Mountains in Snow." (c. 1942) Two other murals have been removed and are now stored at the National Museum of American Art: Dorothy and Fred Farr, "Sports Related to Food" (1942). Gertrude Goodrich mural, originally placed around the four walls of the cafeteria, depicting typical activities in four parts of the country (1943).    
  • Cohen Federal Building: Shahn Frescoes - Washington DC
    The Wilbur J. Cohen building, originally built for the Social Security Administration in 1938-1940, is home to a magnificent collection of social security themed artworks funded by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts.  The most spectacular of the artworks is a massive, multi-paneled, fresco mural by Lithuanian-born artist Ben Shahn, entitled "The Meaning of Social Security." Shahn's mural cycle covers both sides of the central corridor of the  building. On the east wall are three panels depicting the ills Social Security was meant to alleviate:  "Child Labor, Unemployment, and Old Age."  On the west well are scenes of a society cured of...
  • Commonwealth Post Office Mural - Fullerton CA
    The oil-on-canvas mural Orange Pickers by Paul Julian is the only Works Progress Administration (WPA) post office mural in Orange County. It was painted in 1941 or 1942 at the Federal Arts Studio in Los Angeles and then installed in the lobby of the post office in 1942.  The 6 foot by 13 foot mural depicts images of Fullerton industries including citrus, oil and aviation. The style of the mural is known as regionalism which was very popular during this time period. This mural was Julian’s last public arts project. Julian then went on to have a successful career in the...
  • Convention and Visitors Bureau Mural - Augusta GA
    From contributor Jimmy Emerson, DVM: "Post Office mural entitled "Plantation, Transportation, Education" was painted by Abraham Harriton in 1941. In 1987, the newly appointed Postmaster had the mural removed from the wall of the post office. It now hangs in the Augusta Convention and Visitor's Bureau in the old Enterprise Mill."
  • Conway County Courthouse Mural - Morrilton AR
    The mural "Men at Rest" was painted for the Morrilton post office by Richard Sargent in 1939. The work was sponsored by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts. It is no longer located in the post office, but has instead been moved to the front entryway of the Conway County Courthouse. "Richard Sargent was commissioned for $590 to create a mural for Morrilton, Arkansas as a result of an Honorable Mention in a Section of Fine Arts Competition. The section chose the current composition, formerly titled 'Thirsting Men,' from a number of black and white sketches Sargent had submitted. The mural...
  • Cottonwood County Historical Society Mural - Windom MN
    This mural "Agricultural Theme" was painted for the Windom post office by Charles W. Thwaites in 1943 with funding from the Treasury Section of Fine Arts. The mural, as well as two alternate sketches composed by Thwaites, now hang in the county museum.
  • Courthouse Murals - Wichita KS
    "Oil-on-canvas murals, painted in 1935-1936, are located on the east and west walls of the lobby. Artists J. Ward Lockwood and Richard Haines received the commissions through a post office mural project awarded by the U.S. Treasury Department's Painting and Sculpture Section. "Pioneers in Kansas," the mural by Lockwood (a Kansas native), is a collage of images associated with role and evolution of the Postal Service during the settlement of the western United States. A stagecoach laden with mail and passengers marks the center of the canvas, with the other images radiating around it. A Pony Express rider and a Native...
  • Courthouse Sculptures - Erie PA
    According to the website of the General Services Administration "Young American Man and Young American Woman act as sentinels to the main courtrooms of the 1937 Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse in Erie, Pennsylvania. These two sculptures express the admirable qualities possessed by the young men and women of depression-era America. Kreis communicated the upstanding nature of the figures through his use of monumental, simple forms, and by leaving out any unessential or frivolous details. Further evidence of their moral rectitude is cleverly expressed by the inclusion of the man's faithful dog, which regards his human companion with complete devotion....
  • Cove Station Post Office Mural - Weirton WV
    New Deal mural entitled "Captain Bilderbook's and John Schoolcraft's Expedition from Holiday's Cove to Fort Henry, 1777" painted by Charles Chapman in 1940. At the time this mural was painted, this office was the main office for Holiday's Cove, WV. In 1947, it along with 2 other communities incorporated and took the name "Weirton."
  • Daniel Rhodes Mural - Storm Lake IA
    "Rhodes garnered a strong reputation within the WPA program in Iowa and was awarded three significant mural projects. The first, a mural for the Storm Lake post office titled “Storm Lake,” was designed and installed in 1937. After a new post office was built, the mural was moved to the Storm Lake Public Library. Earnings made from this commission enabled Rhodes to continue his main focus in oil/easel painting." (projects.mtmercy.edu)
  • Delta Music Museum Mural - Ferriday LA
    The "Southern Pattern" was painted by Stuart Purser in 1941. It is located in the lobby of the town's post office, which presently houses the Delta Music Museum.
  • Des Moines Federal Courthouse: Rhodes Mural - Des Moines IA
    The Treasury Section of Fine Arts commissioned "the Wheelwright" painted by artist Daniel Rhodes in 1942 for the Clayton Branch Post Office in St. Louis, Missouri. The mural was removed from the post office in 1971 and relocated to the Des Moines Federal Courthouse, where it is currently on view.    
  • DeWitt City Hall Mural - DeWitt IA
    The mural "Shucking Corn" by John V. Bloom was painted in 1939 with funding from the Treasury Section of Fine Arts for what was then the town post office. The building has since become the DeWitt City Hall.
  • Downtown Post Office Bas Relief - San Diego CA
    Archibald Garner won the Treasury funded competition for ornamentation of the San Diego Post Office and produced these nine glazed, terra-cotta relief panels illustrating the theme "Transportation of the Mail."
  • Downtown Post Office Mural - Burbank CA
    In 1940, Barse Miller painted a two-panel mural at the Downtown Post Office in Burbank, CA. The project was funded by the Section of Fine Arts (SFA) under the newly-created Public Buildings Administration. "This postal branch is graced by a two-panel mural saluting the city's most famous industries--filmmaking and aeronautics. Titled 'People of Burbank,' the 1940 work by Barse Miller fits in with the building's tile and wrought-iron Spanish mission motif" (Rasmussen, 1993). Barse Miller was a teacher at The ArtCenter School in Los Angeles. His other New Deal–funded works in the region include a set of four frescoes (1936) at George...
  • East Boston Station Post Office Mural - Boston MA
    "Communication" Medium: oil on canvas Size: 4 panels, 3' x 9' each
  • East Portland Post Office Mural - Portland OR
    The post office originally held an earlier version of this mural entitled "Post Ride," funded by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts and painted in 1936 by Paul Grellert. During renovation of the post office in the 60's the mural was destroyed. Mr Grellert fortunately was able to paint a recreation of the original mural. The only difference is that in the original, the horse was white.
  • East Texas Oil Museum Murals - Kilgore TX
    The museum contains four murals by Xavier Gonzalez: "Pioneer Saga," "Music of the Plains," "Contemporary Youth" and "Drilling for Oil." They were painted with Treasury Section of Fine Arts funds in 1941 and moved from the post office to the East Texas Oil Museum in 1999.
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