1 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 44
  • Richmond County Courthouse Improvements - Staten Island NY
    The Works Progress Administration worked to "renovate and repair" several buildings on Staten Island (Richmond County), a $225,507 project begun in 1935. One of those buildings was the Richmond County Courthouse, next to the Borough Hall in the St. George district of Staten Island. The courthouse was built in 1919 in Neoclassical style and housed the Richmond County Supreme Court until 2015 (parts of the Supreme Court remain in the old courthouse). Today it is home to two sets of murals by Charles Davis and Axel Horn, originally painted for the old Farm Colony poorhouse and long hung in the old Seaview Hospital.
  • Richmond County Courthouse: Axel Horn Murals - Staten Island NY
    The Richmond County courts are home to two set of murals, one by Axel Horn, a New York-based artist, and another by Charles Davis, an African American artist based in Chicago.  The murals were painted in 1937-38 under the auspices of the Federal Arts Project. There are five murals by Horn, painted with egg tempera on gessoed masonite, 114" x 60" each.  The overall title is Economic Pursuits of the Early American Settlers. The murals have have been moved several times.  They were originally installed in a large workshop  for the benefit of the indigent residents at the Farm Colony,  which was across the road from...
  • Richmond County Courthouse: Charles Davis Murals - Staten Island NY
    The Richmond County courts are home to two set of murals, one by Axel Horn, a New York-based artist, and another by Charles Davis, an African American artist based in Chicago.  The murals were painted in 1937-38 under the auspices of the Federal Arts Project. There are six murals by Davis, in egg tempura on Masonite panels. Davis titled his murals The Progress of American Industry, with the following themes: Railroad Builders Lumbering Agriculture Mining Steel Workers Bridge Builders The murals have have been moved several times.  They were originally installed in a large workshop  for the benefit of the indigent residents at the Farm Colony,  which...
  • Richmond Hill Branch Library Extension - Richmond Hill NY
    The extension of the Richmond Hill branch library in Queens was undertaken as a sponsored federal WPA project during the 1930s.
  • Richmond Hill Public Library Mural - Richmond Hill NY
    In 1936 Philip Evergood completed a 160-foot mural entitled "The Story of Richmond Hill," with funds provided by the Works Progress Administration's (WPA) Federal Art Project. "The left and lighter side of the mural celebrates the bucolic pleasures of Queens, with citizens making merry (couples dancing in the park), The right and darker side depicts less rosy conditions in the heart of the metropolis (laborers and children). A middle section shows planners and dreamers. The mural is displayed over bookcases in the main reading room." (loc.gov)
  • Ridge Road Grading - Elba NY
    The federal Works Progress Administration (WPA) conducted grading work on Ridge Road (formerly Bulgaria Road) in Elba, New York during the 1930s. Additional information is needed to determine the current status of this project.
  • Ridge Road Improvements - Champlain NY
    The federal Works Progress Administration (WPA) improved Ridge Road in Champlain, New York. Work on the 0.7-mile stretch of road employed 52 men.
  • Ridge Road Park Development - Hartsdale NY
    "Portions of the park have historical significance because they were constructed and financed by the Works Progress Administration (W.P.A.). One charmingly rustic single-story picnic shelter, for example, was built in 1942 by the W.P.A."
  • Ridgewood Branch Library Alterations - Ridgewood NY
    A set of alterations to the branch library in Ridgewood, New York was undertaken as a sponsored federal WPA project during the 1930s.
  • Ridgewood YMCA Improvements - Ridgewood NY
    The federal Works Progress Administration worked to conduct repairs and alterations to several civic buildings in Queens as part of a $300,464 project begun in 1935. Buildings improved included what was then the Queens County Magistrate's Courthouse building in Ridgewood, NY. "The Ridgewood YMCA building was constructed in 1931 and served as the Queens County Magistrate's Courthouse. At the time, the brick and limestone-trimmed building was the first courthouse erected in Queens since 1898. The courthouse shuttered its doors in 1962 and the YMCA of Greater New York purchased the building from the city in 1965 for $50,000." (YMCA)
  • Rienzi Playground - Bronx NY
    On December 4, 1941, the NYC Department of Parks announced the start of construction on two new playgrounds in the Bronx, including what is now known as Rienzi Playground. The release explains that the WPA was removing sixteen 1-3 story brick buildings in preparation for the WPA construction of the play area, which would include: volleyball, basketball, tennis, handball and shuffleboard courts; a wading pool; a brick comfort station; slides, swings, seesaws, a sandpit and an exercise unit; and a softball diamond. Though begun by the WPA, however, the work was only completed later. The NYC Parks Department website, as well...
  • Rifle Range Enlargements - West Rush NY
    "Rochester National Defense Cont., Inc., 50-acre semi-military range at West Rush, reached via State 2A to Rush, West Rush Road to Golah; a 600-yd. range, suitable for large and small bore rifle, pistol, and trap shooting. Members only. Grant has been made by WPA for enlarging facilities." The present status of this old facility is unknown to Living New Deal.
  • Riker's Island Library Mural (missing) - East Elmhurst NY
    "Beginning in 1936, Alland supervised the Photo-Mural Section of the Federal Art Project. He installed photo-murals at the Newark Public Library (1936) and at the Riker's Island Penitentiary library (1937)."   (https://dlib.nyu.edu) The Riker's Island mural, entitled "Approach to Manhattan" was designed specifically for the prison. As Alland's submission statement explained: "The subject of this photomural utilizes the familiar aspects of the normal and happy family in the City. The main purpose of this decoration, besides that of relieving the monotony and changing the aspects of a huge prison hall, into a livable library, where those prisoners who have gained the privilege through...
  • Rikers Island Penitentiary Improvements - East Elmhurst NY
    Excerpt from the National Archives and Records Administration, Neg. 17975-D: "Rikers Island Penitentiary. Description of work done by WPA. Erection of four single family residences; two single family residences; 5400 linear feet chain-like fence. Fence around entire institution, fence around baseball field; one concrete coping wall; piping in tunnel to the new proposed buildings. Erection of new hay and feed barn in wagon sheds on Riker's Island. Project No. 665-97-3-22. Social rehabilitation of Prison Inmates, Department of Correction, 2 Rikers Island."   Excerpt from the (1939) WPA Guide to New York City, Federal Writers Project: “The island is now entirely given over to the city's...
  • Rikers Island WPA Murals - East Elmhurst NY
    "Ben Shahn's WPA mural planned for the Rikers Island Penitentiary mess hall was rejected in 1935, the year the prison opened. Harold Lehman's WPA mural "Man's Daily Bread" was mounted there instead circa 1936 but was removed decades later. Thus in a sense, both the planned Shahn mural and the actual Lehman mural could be counted as two murals "missing" in Rikers Island Penitentiary WPA art history. Considerably worse for wear but not missing is a third Rikers Island Penitentiary WPA mural: Anton Refregier's "Home and the Family." Its presence enhances the historic landmark character of NYC's oldest structure in continuous correction-related use. In 1937...
  • Riverside Park Improvements - Tonawanda NY
    Riverside Park in Buffalo, New York was improved in 1938 by the federal Works Progress Administration (WPA). 230 men were put to work on the project.
  • Riverside Park Reconstruction - New York NY
    Riverside Park is a 6.7-mile long waterside public park in Manhattan's Upper West Side, running between the Hudson River and Riverside Drive. Its origins go back to Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux,  the designers of Central Park in the 19th century.  In the 1930s the park was completely redeveloped and expanded, in part in conjunction with the Henry Hudson Parkway, with the help of the New Deal. Researcher Frank da Cruz describes New Deal involvement in the park: "By 1934, the park was in terrible shape; Robert Moses and the NY City Parks Department, using New Deal funding, designers, and labor completely...
  • Riverside Park: 106th St. Overlook Cafe - New York NY
    This charming stone overlook and the surrounding steps in Riverside Park at 106th St. were built with New Deal funds and labor during the massive overhaul of the whole park area from 1934 to 1941. The work was supported mainly by the PWA, CWA, and WPA. The overlook marks the split between the park's upper and lower levels and houses trains that go hurtling by just beyond the arches pictured here. The overlook structure has been turned into a cafe/concession area.
  • Riverside Park: 79th Street Boat Basin - New York NY
    Located along the Henry Hudson Parkway, the 79th Street Boat Basin is a marina, restaurant and still popular Manhattan destination. It was built in the 1930s with extensive New Deal support: "In a way, we owe the existence of the entire Riverside - Fort Washington Park complex to the 79th Street Boat Basin. In 1934, Robert Moses wanted to build a whole new park from 72nd Street all the way to the top of Manhattan but he needed to find the money. He already had funding for the Henry Hudson Parkway. Since the Parkway was to have an exit and entry...
  • Riverside Park: Athletic Fields - New York NY
    Researcher Frank da Cruz explains that: “By 1934, the park was in terrible shape; Robert Moses and the NY City Parks Department, using New Deal funding, designers, and labor completely leveled the original park and replaced it with a new one in which the railroad ran beneath ground level and which, unlike the original park, was full of playgrounds, ball fields, and game courts… The construction of Riverside Park…was a mammoth undertaking supported mainly by PWA, CWA, and WPA from 1934 to 1941, such a huge undertaking that the records don’t even bother to mention individual features like specific playgrounds, ballfields,...
  • Riverside Park: Firemen's Memorial Restoration - New York NY
    The Firemen's Memorial facing Riverside Park on Riverside Drive at 100th Street, 1913. The NY City Parks Department website says: The memorial exemplifies a classical grandeur that characterized several civic monuments built in New York City from the 1890s to World War I, as part of an effort dubbed the City Beautiful Movement, which was meant to improve the standard of urban public design and achieve an uplifting union of art and architecture. This monument has twice undergone extensive restoration, once in the late 1930s, through a W.P.A.-sponsored conservation program, and more recently through a $2 million city-funded capital project completed...
  • Riverside Park: Grant's Tomb Improvements - New York NY
    A great number of improvements to the General Grant National Memorial ("Grant's Tomb") were undertaken by the WPA between 1935 and 1939. As the National Park Service's David Kahn (1980) explains: "Thirty-eight years after the tomb opened, the initial restoration project began in December 1935, when the Works Progress Administration's laborers laid down new marble flooring in the atrium. In 1935-39 WPA cleaned marble (interior and exterior), replaced floors, replaced roof, electric lighting, heating, built curator's office, new stained glass, painted over dirty plaster walls, screens, display racks, brass sculptured busts of five Union generals by WPA artists, installation of eagles...
  • Riverside Park: Grant's Tomb Sculptures - New York NY
    A great number of improvements to the General Grant National Memorial ("Grant's Tomb") were undertaken by the WPA between 1935 and 1939. As the National Park Service's David Kahn (1980) explains: "In 1938 the Federal Art Project selected artists William Mues and Jeno Juszko to design the busts of William T. Sherman, Phillip H. Sheridan, George H. Thomas, James B. McPherson, and Edward Ord. The WPA installed five busts in the circular wall of the atrium surrounding the sarcophagi. After the many contributions of the WPA, the Grant Monument Association held a re-dedication of the tomb on April 27, 1939." The Riverside...
  • Riverside Park: Joan of Arc Statue Restoration - New York NY
    "The Joan of Arc statue on Riverside Drive at 93rd Street, by Anna Vaugh Hyatt Huntington, dedicated in 1915. In 1939, the statue was repatined, its broken sword restored, and its staircase repaired. As noted in references below, this was done by the Parks Department Monuments Restoration Project which was part of the WPA."   (kermitproject.org)
  • Riverside Park: Landscaping - New York NY
    Researcher Frank da Cruz explains here that a major part of the New Deal creation of what is now Riverside Park involved completely re-shaping the land itself. The park was re-engineered from its natural rather steep slope "into two relatively flat areas separated by a retaining wall... The train tracks run behind the retaining wall and under the upper level of the park. The lower level...is on the same level as the river and contains a vast amount of parkland and numerous ball fields, athletic fields, game courts, and playgrounds." In addition to shaping the land itself, New Deal workers...
  • Riverside Park: Playgrounds - New York NY
    Researcher Frank da Cruz explains that: "By 1934, the park was in terrible shape; Robert Moses and the NY City Parks Department, using New Deal funding, designers, and labor completely leveled the original park and replaced it with a new one in which the railroad ran beneath ground level and which, unlike the original park, was full of playgrounds, ball fields, and game courts... The construction of Riverside Park...was a mammoth undertaking supported mainly by PWA, CWA, and WPA from 1934 to 1941, such a huge undertaking that the records don't even bother to mention individual features like specific playgrounds, ballfields,...
  • Road Construction - Peekskill NY
    A road construction project in Peekskill, New York was undertaken during the Great Depression with the aid of federal Public Works Administration (PWA) funds. The PWA supplied a $49,909 grant; the total cost of the project was $125,543. Work occurred between April and November 1936. (PWA Docket No. NY 1126)
  • Road Construction - Rochester NY
    Works Progress Administration laborers did grading and surfacing work for a new road in front of a subway crossing in Rochester. The WPA photo caption indicates that the work was done at Morris Street. More information is needed to determine the current status and exact location of this project.
  • Road Development - Canton NY
    The Massena Observer wrote in 1938 that the vast majority of municipalities in St. Lawrence County, New York had sponsored relief projects with the federal Works Progress Administration (WPA). Among the towns in which the WPA had worked to 'reconstruct' roads was Canton.
  • Road Development - De Kalb NY
    The Massena Observer wrote in 1938 that the vast majority of municipalities in St. Lawrence County, New York had sponsored relief projects with the federal Works Progress Administration (WPA). Among the towns in which the WPA had worked to 'reconstruct' roads was De Kalb.
  • Road Development - Edwards NY
    The Massena Observer wrote in 1938 that the vast majority of municipalities in St. Lawrence County, New York had sponsored relief projects with the federal Works Progress Administration (WPA). Among the towns in which the WPA had worked to 'reconstruct' roads was Edwards.
  • Road Development - Fine NY
    The Massena Observer wrote in 1938 that the vast majority of municipalities in St. Lawrence County, New York had sponsored relief projects with the federal Works Progress Administration (WPA). Among the towns in which the WPA had worked to 'reconstruct' roads was Fine.
  • Road Development - Gouverneur NY
    The Massena Observer wrote in 1938 that the vast majority of municipalities in St. Lawrence County, New York had sponsored relief projects with the federal Works Progress Administration (WPA). Among the towns in which the WPA had worked to 'reconstruct' roads was Gouverneur.
  • Road Development - Hammond NY
    The Massena Observer wrote in 1938 that the vast majority of municipalities in St. Lawrence County, New York had sponsored relief projects with the federal Works Progress Administration (WPA). Among the towns in which the WPA had worked to 'reconstruct' roads was Hammond.
  • Road Development - Helena NY
    The Massena Observer wrote in 1938 that the vast majority of municipalities in St. Lawrence County, New York had sponsored relief projects with the federal Works Progress Administration (WPA). Among the towns in which the WPA had worked to 'reconstruct' roads was Brasher, represented on the map here by the village of Helena.
  • Road Development - Hermon NY
    The Massena Observer wrote in 1938 that the vast majority of municipalities in St. Lawrence County, New York had sponsored relief projects with the federal Works Progress Administration (WPA). Among the towns in which the WPA had worked to 'reconstruct' roads was Hermon.
  • Road Development - Hopkinton NY
    The Massena Observer wrote in 1938 that the vast majority of municipalities in St. Lawrence County, New York had sponsored relief projects with the federal Works Progress Administration (WPA). Among the towns in which the WPA had worked to 'reconstruct' roads was Hopkinton.
  • Road Development - Lawrence Township NY
    The Massena Observer wrote in 1938 that the vast majority of municipalities in St. Lawrence County, New York had sponsored relief projects with the federal Works Progress Administration (WPA). Among the towns in which the WPA had worked to 'reconstruct' roads was Lawrence (not to be confused with the Nassau County town of the same name).
  • Road Development - Lisbon NY
    The Massena Observer wrote in 1938 that the vast majority of municipalities in St. Lawrence County, New York had sponsored relief projects with the federal Works Progress Administration (WPA). Among the towns in which the WPA had worked to 'reconstruct' roads was Lisbon.
  • Road Development - Louisville NY
    The Massena Observer wrote in 1938 that the vast majority of municipalities in St. Lawrence County, New York had sponsored relief projects with the federal Works Progress Administration (WPA). Among the towns in which the WPA had worked to 'reconstruct' roads was Louisville.
1 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 44