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  • Hither Hills State Park Improvements - Montauk NY
    The Suffolk County News reported that between 1935 and 1936, the WPA "improved recreational facilities in following State Parks : Sunken Meadow, Heckscher, Wildwood, Orient Point and Hither Hills..."
  • Hoffman Island Improvements - Staten Island NY
    The WPA worked during the late 1930s to improve "properties of the U.S. Maritime Commission on Hoffman and Swinburne Island in New York Bay" in New York City. Each island was previously artificially created and was, at the time, being used for the U.S. Merchant Marine as a training station. WPA work on the islands included "reconditioning buildings, grounds, utilities and facilities; excavating; back-filling; draining; painting; improving roads and walks; installing electrical and heating facilities; grading and landscaping grounds; doing carpentry and demolition work ..." Approximately $210,000 was dedicated to these projects as well as work to "the Maritime Ship 'Tusitala' at...
  • Holland Stadium - Auburn NY
    Originally known as East High Stadium, what is now Holland Stadium was constructed as a New Deal project undertaken during the Great Depression. Construction on the facility, which lies behind what is now known as Auburn Junior High School, occurred in 1936; football games have been played there ever since. The federal Public Works Administration (P.W.A.) supplied a $48,056 grant for the project, whose total cost was $110,336. P.W.A. Docket No. NY 1405
  • Holland Town Hall - Holland NY
    Holland, New York's Town Hall was constructed by the federal Works Progress Administration (WPA) in 1937-38. The building is still in use today.
  • Hollis-Area Street Improvements - Jamaica NY
    The federal Work Projects Administration undertook a large road repair project starting in 1935 in the borough of Queens. The streets, many of which in New York City were still unpaved, were repaired; particular emphasis was placed on fixing washout-damaged stretches of road. Holes were filled in and the streets were smoothed, surfaced and reconditioned. Roads improved as part of this project (WPA Official Project No. 65-97-9) included block of 91st Avenue between 188th and 189th St. and 189th St. between 91st Ave. and Jamaica Ave. This project is separate from a large, adjacent, Jamaica Avenue paving project that was undertaken by...
  • Homecrest Playground - Brooklyn NY
    The New York Times reported that WPA laborers had begun work in late 1941 on a playground consisting of "two and one-third acres ... The facilities will include a brick comfort station, concrete wading pool, irrigated sandpit and mothers' sitting area, swings, slides, handball court, pipe-frame exercising unit, and areas for skating, basketball and softball." The completion of the project was announced in June 1942.
  • Homicide Court Building (former) Improvements - Brooklyn NY
    The federal Works Progress Administration (WPA) undertook a sizable public building improvement project in Brooklyn, New York beginning in 1935.  The project involved the "Improvement of Public Buildings and Offices" at more than 30 locations, including the old Homicide Court Building at 33-to-35 Snyder Ave. The Homicide Court Building referred to was a 1929 addition to a structure built in 1875 as the Flatbush Town Hall: "When Flatbush and the rest of Brooklyn became part of New York City in 1894, the Town Hall became a police precinct headquarters and the 7th District Magistrate’s Court. In 1929, an addition was built to...
  • Hope Avenue Grade Separation (no longer extant) - Staten Island NY
    A railway-crossing bridge carrying Hope Avenue was built during the mid-1930s as part of a massive grade separation project along what was then the South Beach Branch of the Staten Island Railway. The line has long since been abandoned (as the line was discontinued in 1953) and the space beneath the bridge has been filled in, though there is still a drop-down from the south side of the road. The Public Works Administration (PWA) provided a $1.46 million grant for the $6 million grade crossing elimination project, which included work elsewhere in Staten Island and even in Manhattan. PWA Docket No. NY 4926.
  • Horace Harding Boulevard Improvements - Queens NY
    The federal Work Projects Administration undertook a large road repair project starting in 1935 in the borough of Queens. The streets, many of which in New York City were still unpaved, were repaired; particular emphasis was placed on fixing washout-damaged stretches of road. Holes were filled in and the streets were smoothed, surfaced and reconditioned. Roads improved as part of this project (WPA Official Project No. 65-97-9) included large stretches of Horace Harding Boulevard, which later became part of the Long Island Expressway.
  • Horton Avenue Improvements - Middletown NY
    The Works Progress Administration (WPA) undertook a project in Middletown, New York, "grading and surfacing and resetting of curbs on Horton avenue."
  • House Repairs - Sayville NY
    The Suffolk County News reported in May 1938 that "W.P.A. mechanics ... have been re-roofing, re-painting, and making other repairs and improvements on a number of Candee avenue houses" in Sayville, N.Y. that had recently been "taken over by the Home Owners Loan Corporation."
  • Howard Avenue Improvements - Staten Island NY
    The federal Work Projects Administration put many men to work starting in 1935 with Staten Island street repair and maintenance projects along roads throughout the borough. One project involved the widening and paving of what was then known as Serpentine Road, now a part of Howard Avenue, in the Grymes Hill section of Staten Island. Additional work on the 4,000-foot stretch between Clove Road and Howard Avenue (now, about the intersection of Howard Avenue and Signal Hill Road) involved "reducing the curvature" to make bends less dangerous. (This was, after all, Serpentine Road!)
  • Howard Avenue Widening - Brooklyn NY
    The New York Times reported in 1941 that the WPA was to be involved with several street improvement projects in Brooklyn, including "the widening of Howard Avenue in Brownsville."
  • Howard School (former) - Howard NY
    Built as an elementary school. When multiple rural districts merged to create Avoca Central School, part of the negotiated agreement required a new grade school in Howard. The Howard Grade School was built as part of the project whose main purpose was creating the central school. The Public Works Administration supported the overall project with a $99,000 grant. The former Howard School is now in private hands, and used for business purposes. The building is located on the west side of County Road 70, just south of the Southern Tier Expressway.
  • Howard Von Dohlen Playground - Jamaica NY
    From NYC Parks: "Howard Von Dohlen Playground opened on July 15, 1934, and is one of nine playgrounds built by Parks through the War Memorial Fund. The fund was established in 1921 with $250,000 collected by the New York City Police Department. Until 1934, the money had remained untouched, during which time it had grown in value to $350,000. Seeking additional open spaces for children, Parks Commissioner Robert Moses obtained a legal ruling that permitted the Fund to be spent on several playground developments. The properties were intended to honor the memories of individual soldiers who had given their lives in...
  • Huguenot Avenue Overpass - Staten Island NY
    The bridge carrying Huguenot Avenue over the newly sunken Staten Island Railway was built in 1938, as one link in a large grade crossing removal project sponsored by the Public Works Administration (PWA).
  • Huguenot Children's Library Improvements - New Rochelle NY
    The federal Work Projects Administration worked to improve New Rochelle's, New York's former Huguenot Park Library (opened 1926) during the 1930s. The library, which was used as such until 1992. The building since reopened as a children's library. One WPA project, which involved numerous municipal buildings in New Rochelle including this one, was described by the WPA in its project rolls: "Work includes performing carpentry, masonry, and sheet metal work; excavating and constructing walls; painting, placing tile, and roofing." WPA Official Project No. 665-21-2-635.
  • Huguenot Park-Area Road Development - Staten Island NY
    The federal Work Projects Administration put many men to work starting in 1935 with a Staten Island project that removed dangerous street ditches from roads throughout the borough. Granite block gutters and headers were installed by WPA laborers along a dozen streets, including from Huguenot Avenue from Amboy Road to the Staten Island Railway tracks and along Amboy Road between Huguenot Avenue and the same railroad.
  • Huguenot Railway Station - Staten Island NY
    The Huguenot station of the Staten Island Railway was redeveloped during the late 1930s, as one link in a large grade crossing removal project sponsored by the Public Works Administration (PWA). Work included construction of a new station house on Huguenot Avenue, which is still in use.
  • Humphrey Road Improvements - Cape Vincent NY
    The Cape Vincent Eagle reported that the federal Works Progress Administration (WPA) improved 11 roads in the town of Cape Vincent, New York. "All school bus, milk, and rural mail routes, the roads form an important part of the town's highway system." The project encompassed eight miles of road, and called for "grading, draining, placing base, trimming shoulders and ditches, surfacing and incidental appurtenant work." Roads improved included "Humphrey, leading from Mud Creek northerly one mile."
  • Hunter College: North Building - New York NY
    The North Building at Hunter College was built between 1937 and 1940, using funds from the Public Works Administration (PWA). It lies between 68th  and 69th Streets along Park Avenue.  FDR dedicated the building on October 1940 and in his speech he recounted the story of how Mayor LaGuardia asked for the funding. North Building’s designer was the firm of Shreve, Lamb & Harmon, in consultation with Harrison & Fouilhoux. Wallace Harrison had already designed Radio City Music Hall and the auditorium in Hunter’s building, though much simpler, bears a related design If the façade appears familiar, the main designers also built the Empire State...
  • Hunts Point Branch Library Expansion - Bronx NY
    "The Hunts Point Branch of the New York Public Library is the thirty-seventh and final Carnegie branch library to be built in New York City and the ninth to be constructed in the Bronx. It has been in continuous operation as a branch library for over eighty years." The library was built in 1929. From 1935-38, the library was expanded by the WPA, "with the construction of a rear two-story addition that accommodated a new activity space and supplementary reading room."   (https://hdc.org)
  • Hunts Point Playground - Bronx NY
    In October 1935, the New York City Department of Parks announced the opening of twelve new playgrounds, including this one at Hunts Point. Although the release does not specify federal involvement, researcher Frank da Cruz explains here that “it is safe to say that every single project completed by the NYC Park Department during the 1930s was federally funded to some degree.” After April 1935, the WPA was especially involved in the development of the New York park system.
  • Huron St. Public Bath (former) Improvements - Brooklyn NY
    The federal Works Progress Administration undertook a $93,900 project starting in 1935 to modernize and otherwise improve several public (now-former) bath facilities in Brooklyn, NY. The public baths on Huron St. (a few hundred feet west of Manhattan Avenue, on the north side of the road) were constructed in 1903-4; the baths closed in 1960, but the building is still standing. The facilities identified as part of the WPA project were: 209 Wilson Ave. Municipal Baths, Coney Island Duffield Street Hicks Street Pitkin Ave. Huron St. Montrose Ave.
  • Hyde Park Elementary School - Hyde Park NY
    "The 's original fieldstone building was built in 1940, after close consultation between the local school board and President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, a native of Hyde Park. ... In 1993 the school building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places... In 1938 met privately with members of the Hyde Park school board and other local officials at his family home in town. He had closely followed their need for an elementary school, and proposed to them that the Public Works Administration (PWA) make federal money available to Hyde Park for the construction of three schools (now Violet Avenue...
  • Hylan Avenue Repairs - Staten Island NY
    A program of repairs to Hylan Blvd. along a 1.2-mile stretch from Page Avenue to Arthur Kill (Staten Island Sound) was undertaken as a sponsored federal WPA project during the 1930s. The project occurred in the Tottenville neighborhood of Staten Island. Repairs included "resurfacing the existing pavement (44 ft. wide) ... and paving the wings (8 ft. wide each) ...; constructing concrete curb on both sides."
  • I.S. 201 Dyker Heights - Brooklyn NY
    What's now the Dyker Heights Intermediate School was constructed during the mid-1930s as a Public Works Administration (PWA) project.
  • Incinerator Repairs - Huntington NY
    A 1936 news story references WPA repairs to a "fire-gutted Town of Huntington incinerator." The location and status of this site is unknown to Living New Deal.
  • IND Sixth Avenue Subway Line - New York NY
    Construction of New York's Sixth Avenue subway line was enabled by the federal Public Works Administration (PWA) during the 1930s. The PWA supplied a massive loan and grant totaling $23,160,000 for the project, one of the largest New Deal construction undertakings in the country.  The Sixth Avenue was a branch of the original IND Eighth Avenue line, opened in 1932. Four stations opened in southern Manhattan in January 1934; an extension to Brooklyn opened April 1934.  An extension taking the line up Sixth Avenue, with six new stations, opened December 1940.
  • IND Sixth Avenue Subway: 14th Street Station - New York NY
    The Sixth Avenue branch trunk line of New York City's Independent Subway (IND) was constructed during the 1930s with the aid of federal Public Works Administration (PWA) funds. On December 15, 1940, six IND subway stations opened along Sixth Avenue. The 14th Street subway station was one of the six to open at this time.
  • IND Sixth Avenue Subway: 23rd Street Station - New York NY
    The Sixth Avenue branch trunk line of New York City's Independent Subway (IND) was constructed during the 1930s with the aid of federal Public Works Administration (PWA) funds. On December 15, 1940, six IND subway stations opened along Sixth Avenue. The 23rd Street subway station was one of the six to open at this time.
  • IND Sixth Avenue Subway: 34th Street Station - New York NY
    The Sixth Avenue branch trunk line of New York City's Independent Subway (IND) was constructed during the 1930s with the aid of federal Public Works Administration (PWA) funds. On December 15, 1940, six IND subway stations opened along Sixth Avenue. The 34th Street–Herald Square subway station was one of the six to open at this time.
  • IND Sixth Avenue Subway: 42nd Street Station - New York NY
    The Sixth Avenue branch trunk line of New York City's Independent Subway (IND) was constructed during the 1930s with the aid of federal Public Works Administration (PWA) funds. On December 15, 1940, six IND subway stations opened along Sixth Avenue. The 42nd Street–Bryant Park subway station was one of the six to open at this time.
  • IND Sixth Avenue Subway: 47th–50th Streets Station - New York NY
    The Sixth Avenue branch trunk line of New York City's Independent Subway (IND) was constructed during the 1930s with the aid of federal Public Works Administration (PWA) funds. On December 15, 1940, six IND subway stations opened along Sixth Avenue. The 47th–50th Streets – Rockefeller Center subway station was one of the six to open at this time.
  • IND Sixth Avenue Subway: Broadway–Lafayette Street Station - New York NY
    The Sixth Avenue branch trunk line of New York City's Independent Subway (IND) was constructed during the 1930s with the aid of federal Public Works Administration (PWA) funds. On January 1, 1936, four subway stations opened in southern Manhattan, part of a $17.3 million project that extended the subway from Washington Square to the Lower East Side. The Broadway – Lafayette Street station was one of the four to open at this time.
  • IND Sixth Avenue Subway: Delancey Street Station - New York NY
    The Sixth Avenue branch trunk line of New York City's Independent Subway (IND) was constructed during the 1930s with the aid of federal Public Works Administration (PWA) funds. On January 1, 1936, four subway stations opened in southern Manhattan, part of a $17.3 million project that extended the subway from Washington Square to the Lower East Side. The Delancey Street subway station at Essex Street was one of the four to open at this time.
  • IND Sixth Avenue Subway: East Broadway Station - New York NY
    The Sixth Avenue branch trunk line of New York City's Independent Subway (IND) was constructed during the 1930s with the aid of federal Public Works Administration (PWA) funds. On January 1, 1936, four subway stations opened in southern Manhattan, part of a $17.3 million project that extended the subway from Washington Square to the Lower East Side. The East Broadway subway station was one of the four to open at this time.
  • IND Sixth Avenue Subway: Old Elevated Line Demolition - New York NY
    Federal Works Progress Administration (WPA) workers helped to dismantle the Sixth Avenue elevated train line in Manhattan, which was replaced by the new Sixth Avenue IND subway, a Public Works Administration (PWA) project.
  • IND Sixth Avenue Subway: Rutgers Street Tunnel - New York to Brooklyn NY
    The Sixth Avenue branch trunk line of New York City's Independent Subway (IND) was constructed during the 1930s with the aid of federal Public Works Administration (PWA) funds. On January 1, 1936, four subway stations opened in southern Manhattan, part of a $17.3 million project that extended the subway from Washington Square to the Lower East Side. The Rutgers Street subway tunnel enabled further extension of the line to Brooklyn at the York Street Station.   Use of the tunnel began in 1936.
  • IND Sixth Avenue Subway: Second Avenue [Houston Street] Station - New York NY
    The Sixth Avenue branch trunk line of New York City's Independent Subway (IND) was constructed during the 1930s with the aid of federal Public Works Administration (PWA) funds. On January 1, 1936, four subway stations opened in southern Manhattan, part of a $17.3 million project that extended the subway from Washington Square to the Lower East Side. The Second Avenue station on Houston Street was one of the four to open at this time.
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