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  • Alhambra School (former) Improvements - Phoenix AZ
    The federal Works Progress Administration (WPA) conducted improvement work at the old Alhambra School in Phoenix, Arizona during the 1930s. A gymnasium was also constructed in 1938. Living New Deal believes the old facility to be demolished.
  • Arizona State Capitol Annex Building - Phoenix AZ
    The Public Works Administration (PWA) funded the construction of the State Capitol Annex Building in 1938. The University of Arizona Libraries Digital Collections information page on State Capitol murals mentions that PWA funds were used "to hire Jay Datus to paint a series of murals entitled 'The Pageant of Arizona Progress.' Datus came to Arizona in 1937 at the age of 23, already an accomplished and well-known artist. He spent two years in research for these works in order to accurately depict the dress and actions of his subjects. His figures include Native Americans, miners, explorers, missionaries and pioneers." According to C.W....
  • Arizona State Fairgrounds Stadium and Art - Phoenix AZ
    The Works Progress Administration built the grandstand at the Arizona State Fair grounds in Phoenix. "As the Great Depression deepened and thousands were uprooted and looking for work, numerous fairgrounds were turned into camps for these transients. The Arizona State Fairgrounds provided a temporary place to stay and an opportunity to earn money through labor. Funded by the Federal Emergency Relief Administration and later the Works Progress Administration, transients helped to construct the stadium. A fifty-foot grandstand, an adobe wall on three sides of the grounds, and an auto racing track inside the horse track were created in 1936. Exhibit buildings...
  • Arizona State Hospital Additions - Phoenix AZ
    The Works Progress Administration built additions for the Arizona State Hospital (also known as the Arizona State Hospital for the Insane) in Phoenix. The present condition of the structures in unknown to the Living New Deal.
  • Buckeye Road Sidewalks and Improvements - Phoenix AZ
    The federal Works Progress Administration (WPA) constructed sidewalks along, and otherwise improved, Buckeye Road in Phoenix, Arizona during the 1930s.
  • Coronado Historic Neighborhood Sidewalks - Phoenix AZ
    WPA created sidewalks and curbs poured as the neighborhood developed between 1939 and 1942.
  • Coronado Park - Phoenix AZ
    "Phoenix has no shortage of projects. The city’s park system is a major benefactor, with huge undertakings in places like South Mountain Park and Encanto Park and smaller projects, such as a bathhouse in Coronado Park...South Mountain Park near Central Avenue and Baseline Road was home to a CCC camp that employed 4,000 young men between 1933 and 1940. They built lookout points, ramadas, trails and bathrooms that are historical and architectural gems today."
  • East Van Buren Street Improvements - Phoenix AZ
    The federal Works Progress Administration (WPA) worked to develop and improve Phoenix, Arizona's East Van Buren Street during the 1930s.
  • Eastlake Park - Phoenix AZ
    The New Deal contributed to the development of Verde Park, a park in Phoenix, Arizona. Sometimes mis-attributed to the Works Progress Administration (WPA), the following projects were enabled by Public Works Administration (PWA) funding. The park was originally called Phoenix Park, renamed Eastlake Park in 1903, and bought by the City of Phoenix in 1914 (City of Phoenix African American Historic Property Survey pp 29-30). "In 1937 funding provided for the construction at Eastlake Park of a bathhouse, showers, and dressing rooms for the pool. Two years later, the city added lights, swings, sandboxes, sports facilities, and equipment." "...the park was...
  • Emerson School (former) Addition - Phoenix AZ
    The Public Works Administration (PWA) provided funding for the construction of several additions to schools in Phoenix, Arizona, including to what was then Emerson School. The facility now houses administrative offices for the school district. Emerson Elementary School relocated to a new facility at the eastern end of their block. Per Arizona Republic: Phoenix city schools have an allotment of $170,909, which provides for additions to five grade schools. The Jackson school addition is completed and Franklin, Emerson, Lowell and Stevenson projects are under way.
  • Encanto Blvd. Sidewalk - Phoenix AZ
    The W.P.A. constructed sidewalks in Phoenix, AZ, including at "Encanto & First Ave."
  • Encanto Park Bandshell (destroyed) - Phoenix AZ
    This bandshell was part of a large Public Works Administration (PWA)-sponsored development project at Encanto Park in Phoenix, Arizona. "The revival of interest in listening to music out of doors has not been overlooked by the city of Phoenix in its park improvement program, and this band shell in the Dorris-Norton Park provides a place where the bands and orchestras of the city can play. The shell is constructed entirely of wood covered with stucco and has been designed to reflect and amplify the sound over a large area of the park. It was completed in June 1937 at a construction...
  • Encanto Park Improvements and Clubhouse - Phoenix AZ
    The New Deal contributed to the development of Encanto Park, then known alternatively as both Encanto Park and Dorris-Norton Park. Per a 1936 article in Arizona Republic about Public Works Administration (PWA) investments was this multi-year endeavor: Among park projects is one calling for improvement of the Dorris-Norton park in the northwestern section of the city. Here an 18-hole golf course has been built, together with a sprinkling system. Also planned are a club house, boating house and lagoon 1 1/4 miles in length. The cost of improvements will approximate $250,000. Adjacent to Dorris-Norton park is Encanto park, which is being turned...
  • Federal Building and Post Office (former) - Phoenix AZ
    The former Phoenix Federal Building and Post Office (now owned by ASU) was designed by Phoenix architectural firm Lescher and Mahoney in the Spanish Colonial Revival style. Construction had begun in 1932, before the advent of FDR's presidency (and thus prior to the New Deal); however, the building bears a 1935 cornerstone, which places it well within the time of FDR! Wikipedia explains: "A site was chosen in 1931 and Phoenix architects Lescher and Mahoney were commissioned to design a six-story building that was intended to house all of the federal services in the city. Construction was begun on the foundations....
  • Federal Building and Post Office (former) Murals - Phoenix AZ
    The historic former Federal Building and Post Office in Phoenix, Arizona houses examples of New Deal artwork. In 1937 the U.S. Treasury’s Section of Fine Arts commissioned artist La Verne Nelson Black to create two murals for the east wing of the post office, respectively entitled "Historical Background" and "Progress of the Pioneer." The murals present images of Anglo-American settlement and industrialization. Black moved with his family to Phoenix for health reasons and focused his painting and sculpture on the historic West and Native Americans. Another three murals funded by the Section were painted by Oscar Berninghaus. They hang in...
  • Franklin School Addition - Phoenix AZ
    The Public Works Administration (PWA) provided funding for the construction of several additions to schools in Phoenix, Arizona, including to Franklin School. The facility is now Franklin Police and Fire High School. Per Arizona Republic: Phoenix city schools have an allotment of $170,909, which provides for additions to five grade schools. The Jackson school addition is completed and Franklin, Emerson, Lowell and Stevenson projects are under way.
  • Grant Park - Phoenix AZ
    "A major park that African Americans on the west side frequented was Grant Park, located at 3rd Avenue and Grant Street. Grant Park existed as an empty lot with grass and trees until the city Parks and Recreation Department renovated it in 1934 through Civil Works Administration funding. In 1937 Works Progress Administration funding provided for the construction at Eastlake Park of a bathhouse, showers, and dressing rooms for the pool. Two years later, the city added lights, swings, sandboxes, sports facilities, and equipment. The park added a bandstand, tennis courts, and a recreation hall where teens in the 1950s...
  • Harmon Park Expansion - Phoenix AZ
    The New Deal contributed to the development of Harmon Park, a park in Phoenix, Arizona. The Public Works Administration (PWA) provided funding for improvements at the park. Per Arizona Republic: "Harmon park, in the southwest part of the city, has been trebled in size. The city and PWA have invested about $9,000 in recent improvements." This development took place among a massive $923,000 Phoenix park improvement project sponsored by the PWA; PWA Docket No. 2637.
  • Jackson School (demolished) Addition - Phoenix AZ
    The Public Works Administration (PWA) provided funding for the construction of several additions to schools in Phoenix, Arizona, including the former Jackson School located along the east side of S 20th Ave. between W Madison St. and W Jackson St. The school is no longer extant; the grounds are now home to the Arizona State Library Archives. Per Arizona Republic: Phoenix city schools have an allotment of $170,909, which provides for additions to five grade schools. The Jackson school addition is completed and Franklin, Emerson, Lowell and Stevenson projects are under way.
  • James Park - Phoenix AZ
    The New Deal contributed to the development of James Park, a park in Phoenix, Arizona. Per a 1936 article in Arizona Republic about Public Works Administration (PWA) investments was this: "James park, 11 acres in the northeast part of the city, will have a swimming pool and bath house, as well as facilities for tennis, horseshoes and a children's playground. About $50,000 will be spent on this park alone." This development took place among a massive $923,000 Phoenix park improvement project sponsored by the PWA; PWA Docket No. 2637. Living New Deal does not know the exact location of this park. If it...
  • Lowell School (demolished) Addition - Phoenix AZ
    The Public Works Administration (PWA) provided funding for the construction of several additions to schools in Phoenix, Arizona, including to what was then Lowell School. The facility has since been demolished; its site, along the west side of S 1st Ave. between W Buckeye Rd. and W Yavapai St., is now a parking lot at the east end of the current Lowell Elementary School grounds. Per Arizona Republic: Phoenix city schools have an allotment of $170,909, which provides for additions to five grade schools. The Jackson school addition is completed and Franklin, Emerson, Lowell and Stevenson projects are under way.
  • Lynwood and 15th Street Sidewalks - Phoenix AZ
    The Works Progress Administration built sidewalks on Lynwood and 15th Street in the west side of Phoenix, circa 1937.
  • Monterey Park - Phoenix AZ
    The New Deal enabled development of what is now known as Monterey Park in Phoenix, Arizona. The Public Works Administration (PWA) provided funding for the project. Per Arizona Republic: "Eleven acres of ground has been purchased and improved at Third and Oak streets, at a cost of $3,000." This development took place among a massive $923,000 Phoenix park improvement project sponsored by the PWA; PWA Docket No. 2637.
  • National Guard Arsenal (Papago Park)- Phoenix AZ
    "The old National Guard Arsenal is the second largest adobe building in continuous use in the United States. Funded by the Works Progress Administration in 1936, it was part of the recreation development of Papago Park, an expansive, designed landscape."
  • North High School - Phoenix AZ
    Phoenix, Arizona's North High School was constructed with the assistance of Public Works Administration (PWA) funds in 1939. "The North Phoenix High School was built to relieve the overcrowded Phoenix Union High School which enrolled over 5,000 students in 1939. The construction of the North Phoenix High School was financed by both PWA funds totaling more than $365,000 and money from a two million dollar bond issue. All the buildings at North Phoenix High School were completed in 1939 except for the athletic field which was built in 1940." (nps.gov)
  • Papago Highway - Tempe to Scottsdale AZ
    The Works Progress Administration carried out road construction on the Papago Highway, connecting Tempe with Scottsdale. This is possibly the road now known as N Galvin Parkway, not to be confused with the Interstate highway known as the Papago Freeway.
  • Papago Park Amphitheater - Phoenix AZ
    The amphitheater in the Papago Buttes at the north end of the Papago city park in Phoenix AZ was built by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in 1933-34. "Civilian Conservation Corps camp SP5A constructed an amphitheater built into Papago Buttes southeast of the Arsenal between December 1933 and April 1934. The open-air amphitheater accommodates 3,500 people; it has been used for many functions, but most memorable were the Easter Sunrise Services." (content.library.arizona.edu) Maintenance of the amphitheater appears to be somewhat neglected today (2019).
  • Phoenix College Auditorium - Phoenix AZ
    The Public Works Administration funded the construction an auditorium building at the Junior College (today Phoenix College) in Phoenix. The facade architecture features Art Deco elements and white plaster finish. The auditorium is still in service today at Phoenix College.  
  • Phoenix College Buildings and Murals - Phoenix AZ
    "In 1939 Phoenix College moved from its old location to a new site at Thomas and 15th. The architectural firm of Lescher and Mahoney was hired with Public Works Administration funds to design the first six buildings for the new campus. The Liberal Arts and Science buildings; a gym; a combination library, auditorium and administration building; a cafeteria; and a central heating plant formed the core of the college for many years. Although some now support different activities, all six buildings are still standing. The lower level of the new library contains two paintings funded by the Federal Emergency Relief...
  • Phoenix Homesteads - Phoenix AZ
    "In 1934 the Division of Subsistence Homesteads purchased a tract of land on what was then the outskirts of Phoenix in order to build a public housing community for low-income residents. Construction of the first half of the Phoenix Homesteads began in 1934 and was completed in 1935. These Pueblo Revival style adobe homes were built on 0.75-acre parcels to accommodate subsistence gardens and small farm animals. Fruit, nut, and olive trees added to the self-sufficiency of the community. Trees and shrubs were planted for shade and privacy. A second small-scale farming cooperative was planned in 1935 by the Resettlement...
  • Phoenix Municipal Stadium (former) - Phoenix AZ
    The New Deal enabled development of the former Phoenix Municipal Stadium, which "for many years was identified as Nace stadium." The Public Works Administration (PWA) provided funding for the project. The stadium occupied the block bounded by E Mohave St., S 2nd St., E Pima St., and S 3rd St. Per Arizona Republic: Harry Nace of Phoenix made the city a gift of ground to be used as a ball park. The city with the aid of PWA erected a grand stand at a cost of approximately $57,000, which is leased to Mr. Nace. Per Wikipedia, the "ballpark opened in 1936 and had...
  • Pueblo Grande Excavations - Phoenix AZ
    The Public Works Administration (PWA) provided funding for this unique project in Phoenix, Arizona. Per Arizona Republic: Phoenix also included $15,000 in its program for exploration of the Pueblo Grande ruins, about three miles east of the city. Under the program and aided by Odd Halseth, archeologist, excavations in this area steadily have been advanced and important scientific studies forwarded. This development took place among a massive $923,000 Phoenix park improvement project sponsored by the PWA; PWA Docket No. 2637.
  • Road Work - Phoenix AZ
    "The PWA has made a grant of $61,200 to the city of Phoenix, Maricopa County, Arizona, for street improvements including paving of portions of 8th, Richland St., 9th, Monte Vista Road, Mitchell St., Coronado Road, and Almeria Road. Estimated cost is $136,000"
  • Roosevelt Mini Park - Phoenix AZ
    The New Deal enabled development of what is now known as Roosevelt Mini Park, on the east side of North 3rd Avenue just south of W Roosevelt St., in Phoenix, Arizona. The Public Works Administration (PWA) provided funding for the endeavor. Per Arizona Republic: "Approximately $4,000 is being spent to create a rest spot in a small piece of city property at Third Avenue and Roosevelt street." This development took place among a massive $923,000 Phoenix park improvement project sponsored by the PWA; PWA Docket No. 2637.
  • South Mountain Park: CCC Camps - Phoenix AZ
    South Mountain Park in Phoenix AZ was the site of two Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) camps from 1933 to 1940, labeled SP-3A and SP-4A.  Around 4,000 CCC enrollees passed through the camps over that time, in Companies 864, 874, and possibly others. The camps appear to have been located on level ground near the entrance to the park, perhaps near the present site of the Environmental Education Center.  It is not clear from historic photographs and their labels if the camps were at a single site or were separate.  Remnants of CCC barracks are said to be still visible (NNDPA 2012). The...
  • South Mountain Park: Lookouts - Phoenix AZ
    South Mountain Park in Phoenix AZ was developed for public recreation by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) from 1933 to 1940.  The best known of the works by the CCC is the large stone shelter at the Dobbins Lookout, which is the popular symbol of the park and famous for its spectacular views of the city of Phoenix.  Dobbins lookout is accessible by car via Summit Road, which has a large parking area with low stone walls (presumably by the CCC, as well). There is a small stone shelter not far west of Dobbins Lookout and a platform lookout, with a low...
  • South Mountain Park: Picnic Ramadas - Phoenix AZ
    South Mountain Park in Phoenix AZ was developed for public recreation by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) from 1933 to 1940. Among the works of the CCC were two ramadas, which are large, elaborate picnic areas, with stunning views north over the city of Phoenix. The ramadas consist of polished concrete picnic tables protected from the desert sun by wooden roofs raised on stone or concrete pillars, with large central spaces surrounded by stone walls.  The big ramada is very extensive and reached by stone steps.  Low stone walls line the approach road to the ramadas and the complex includes a path...
  • South Mountain Park: Ranger Station - Phoenix AZ
    South Mountain Park in Phoenix AZ was developed for public recreation by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) from 1933 to 1940. One the main works done by the CCC was  an entrance station complex that included a museum, administrative offices, caretaker's house and entrance kiosk.  The museum and office building was completed in 1934 and was the first permanent structure in the park;  the residence and kiosk were added in 1937-38 (NNDPA 2012).  The entire complex is the present Ranger Station at the park entrance. The ranger station is a remarkable stone structure, built of flat, dark stones and projecting roof...
  • South Mountain Park: Roads and Trails - Phoenix AZ
    South Mountain Park in Phoenix AZ was developed for public recreation by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) from 1933 to 1940.  During that time, the CCC enrollees built many, if not most, of the roads and trails in the park – though we cannot be sure exactly which ones.
  • State Capitol Annex Building Mural - Phoenix AZ
    From the University of Arizona Libraries Digital Collection: “Public Works Administration funds were used to construct the State Capitol Annex Building in 1938 and to hire Jay Datus to paint a series of murals entitled “The Pageant of Arizona Progress.” Datus came to Arizona in 1937 at the age of 23, already an accomplished and well-known artist. He spent two years in research for these works in order to accurately depict the dress and actions of his subjects. His figures include Native Americans, miners, explorers, missionaries and pioneers.”
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