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  • Spencer Creek Dam and Lake - Comanche County OK
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) created a dam on Spencer Creek in northern the Wichita Mountains of Oklahoma, in 1933/4. The lake was "all inside the game pasture" and the public required a permit in order to visit it. The exact location and status of the structure and lake are unknown to Living New Deal.
  • Playground Erosion Control - Jefferson City MO
    The Works Progress Administration (WPA) conducted work "building rip rap wall along the creek in the negro playground between Atchison and Ashley streets on Missouri avenue." This is, "large stones placed to prevent erosion, along Wears Creek and Dunklin Boulevard between Atchison and Ashley." The exact location (on a modern map) and status of the facility is unknown to Living New Deal.
  • James Park - Phoenix AZ
    The New Deal contributed to the development of James Park, a park in Phoenix, Arizona. Per a 1936 article in Arizona Republic about Public Works Administration (PWA) investments was this: "James park, 11 acres in the northeast part of the city, will have a swimming pool and bath house, as well as facilities for tennis, horseshoes and a children's playground. About $50,000 will be spent on this park alone." This development took place among a massive $923,000 Phoenix park improvement project sponsored by the PWA; PWA Docket No. 2637. Living New Deal does not know the exact location of this park. If it...
  • Camp Mercer - Mercer WI
    Camp Mercer is a historical site/trail and serves as a piece of Wisconsin history by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). Camp Mercer still exists in its current location and is primarily known for its trail that many can walk through and learn about the history of the area. Camp Mercer was built in 1933 by the CCC and became the headquarters of the northern woods of Wisconsin. The role of this camp was to station young men before dispatching them to neighboring locations. These men were noted in the newspaper written at the time, The Mercer Monitor, where they would...
  • Whittier Elementary School - Long Beach CA
    Whittier Elementary School was built in 1935, likely with New Deal funding. The 1933 Long Beach Earthquake destroyed hundreds of schools throughout Southern California. “On August 29, 1933, Long Beach citizens approved a $4,930,000 bond measure for the rebuilding of schools. Applications for approximately thirty-five schools were filed with the Works Progress Administration (WPA) and Public Works Administration (PWA); federal grants up to thirty percent of labor and material costs were obtained. To minimize costs, building materials were salvaged from damaged buildings, some schools were rehabilitated, and new schools were constructed with basic amenities without cafeterias, libraries, auditoriums, swimming pools, or...
  • Renaissance High School for the Arts - Long Beach CA
    Long Beach High School (the current site of Renaissance High School for the Arts) was built in 1935, likely with New Deal funding. The 1933 Long Beach Earthquake destroyed hundreds of schools throughout Southern California. “On August 29, 1933, Long Beach citizens approved a $4,930,000 bond measure for the rebuilding of schools. Applications for approximately thirty-five schools were filed with the Works Progress Administration (WPA) and Public Works Administration (PWA); federal grants up to thirty percent of labor and material costs were obtained. To minimize costs, building materials were salvaged from damaged buildings, some schools were rehabilitated, and new schools were...
  • Longfellow Elementary School - Long Beach CA
    Longfellow Elementary School was built in 1935, likely with New Deal funding. It is unclear if the 1935 structure(s) survived subsequent additions/remodels. The 1933 Long Beach Earthquake destroyed hundreds of schools throughout Southern California. “On August 29, 1933, Long Beach citizens approved a $4,930,000 bond measure for the rebuilding of schools. Applications for approximately thirty-five schools were filed with the Works Progress Administration (WPA) and Public Works Administration (PWA); federal grants up to thirty percent of labor and material costs were obtained. To minimize costs, building materials were salvaged from damaged buildings, some schools were rehabilitated, and new schools were constructed...
  • Sato Academy of Mathematics and Science - Long Beach CA
    Hill Classical Middle School (now Sato Academy of Mathematics and Science) was built in 1935, likely with New Deal funding. It is unclear if the 1935 structure(s) survived a 1957 addition/remodel. The 1933 Long Beach Earthquake destroyed hundreds of schools throughout Southern California. “On August 29, 1933, Long Beach citizens approved a $4,930,000 bond measure for the rebuilding of schools. Applications for approximately thirty-five schools were filed with the Works Progress Administration (WPA) and Public Works Administration (PWA); federal grants up to thirty percent of labor and material costs were obtained. To minimize costs, building materials were salvaged from damaged buildings,...
  • Long Beach City College, Liberal Arts Campus: Language/Social-Science Building - Long Beach CA
    Three buildings at Long Beach City College's Liberal Arts Campus (formerly Long Beach Junior College) were constructed with Public Works Administration (PWA) funding in 1935. The original campus was destroyed by the 1933 Long Beach Earthquake. The language/social-science building "has 20,700 square feet of floor area and is constructed of wood frame and stucco" (Short & Stanley-Brown, 1939). The building's status—extant or not—is yet to be confirmed. The physical-science and English buildings were also completed with PWA funding at this time.
  • Long Beach City College, Liberal Arts Campus: English Building - Long Beach CA
    Three buildings at Long Beach City College's Liberal Arts Campus (formerly Long Beach Junior College) were constructed with Public Works Administration (PWA) funding in 1935. The original campus was destroyed by the 1933 Long Beach Earthquake. The English building was constructed "of wood frame and stucco, with 17,400 square feet of floor space" (Short & Stanley-Brown, 1939). The building's status—extant or not—is yet to be confirmed. The physical-science and language/social-science buildings were also completed with PWA funding at this time.
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