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  • McKee Bridge Picnic Ground (McKee Bridge Forest Camp): Riverbank Retaining Wall - Ruch OR
    In the Rogue River National Forest, Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) enrollees from Camp Applegate learned the techniques of masonry construction through various projects at the McKee Bridge Picnic Ground. A 200 foot long rock retaining wall along the riverbank was the largest masonry project. It separates the picnic grounds from the beach adjacent to the Applegate River. The wall, made of local bedrock and river rock, reinforces the terraced picnic area and provides stone steps to the beach as well. There are three staircases in this project. The retaining wall is five to eight feet high, adjusted as required by...
  • McKee Bridge Picnic Ground (McKee Bridge Forest Camp): Community Kitchen - Ruch OR
    The Community Kitchen Shelter is the largest Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) built feature at the McKee Bridge Picnic Ground. The 18' x 35' structure demonstrates the rustic-style design work that CCC enrollees used in the development of many US Forest Service campgrounds in Oregon. During 1935-1936, CCC enrollees from Camp Applegate learned the carpentry and masonry required that went into the kitchen shelter, using local stone and wood. The entrance to the kitchen shelter faces the Applegate River to the south. That elevation highlights the low-pitched wooden roof covered in wood shingles, and use of parallel, flattened logs that enclose the...
  • McKee Bridge Picnic Ground (McKee Bridge Forest Camp) - Ruch OR
    In 1935, enrollees from the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Camp Applegate began construction of a forest camp on the banks of the Applegate River near the McKee Bridge. The site already served as a popular local swimming hole and the CCC work would build on this popularity to open new public recreational opportunities in the Rogue River National Forest. The McKee Forest Camp opened in 1936 with privies, a bathhouse, a playground, and a community kitchen shelter as well as camp stoves, fire rings and picnic tables for day use. By the late 1930s, the Forest Camp served as a...
  • CCC Camp S-88 - Townsend MA
    The Civilian Conservation Corps, established Camp S-88 on the east side of the Townsend State Forest, in Townsend, MA in 1935. The CCC worked on reclaiming fire-damaged areas. The camp no longer exists, though there are reports that cellars associated with the camp have been found on the site.
  • Birch Creek Camp - Dillon MT
    The Birch Creek Camp was located in Beaverhead County. The ranger station was on Birch Creek, about two miles above the campsite. A group of twenty-five Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers and one officer were first taken to the site location to build the camp in April of 1935. A total of 200 workers ended up at the camp. They arrived about 2-3 weeks after the initial 25 had arrived. Birch Creek was a “show camp,” meaning it was staged to impress dignitaries on tour for the Fort Missoula CCC District. The first major project assigned to the Birch Creek...
  • Rowan University (Former Glassboro State Normal School) Improvements - Glassboro NJ
    Glassboro State Normal School, founded in 1923, trained South Jersey women and men to be elementary school teachers. In 1935, when they received federal funds, there were 330 students at the school. Today, Glassboro State Normal School is Rowan University. A rapidly growing institution with a full complement of University undergraduate subjects, two medical schools, a nursing school, and a new school of veterinary medicine, Rowan has bounded beyond its origins as a Normal School. In the summer of 1935, Dr. J. J. Savitz received approval from the Works Progress Administration of Camden County 8th District for several Improvement projects for...
  • Burbank Elementary School Rehabilitation - Long Beach, CA
    The 1933 Long Beach Earthquake destroyed hundreds of schools throughout Southern California. Originally built in 1922, Burbank Elementary School in Long Beach, CA, was rehabilitated by Kenneth S. Wing in 1935/36 with New Deal funding. “On August 29, 1933, Long Beach citizens approved a $4,930,000 bond measure for the rebuilding of schools. Applications for approximately thirty-five schools were filed with the Works Progress Administration (WPA) and Public Works Administration (PWA); federal grants up to thirty percent of labor and material costs were obtained. To minimize costs, building materials were salvaged from damaged buildings, some schools were rehabilitated, and new schools were...
  • Avalon School Rehabilitation - Avalon, CA
    The 1933 Long Beach Earthquake destroyed hundreds of schools throughout Southern California. Originally built in 1924, Avalon School on Catalina Island—a part of the Long Beach Unified School District—was rehabilitated by Harold C. Wildman in 1935/36 with New Deal funding. Classes were held in tents while construction was underway. “On August 29, 1933, Long Beach citizens approved a $4,930,000 bond measure for the rebuilding of schools. Applications for approximately thirty-five schools were filed with the Works Progress Administration (WPA) and Public Works Administration (PWA); federal grants up to thirty percent of labor and material costs were obtained. To minimize costs, building...
  • Umatilla Bridge #2117 - Pendleton OR
    With Public Works Administration (PWA) funding, the Oregon Highway Department constructed Umatilla Bridge #2117, also known as the Ballpark Bridge, in 1935. Part of Highway #30 in Pendleton when constructed, Oregon's state bridge designer Conde B. McCullough drew art deco and classical design features together for the small structure. More recently, the bridge has been bypassed by the highway system. Now it provides pedestrian access to park and athletic facilities. As described by Sarah Munro, members of the public continue to view the "art deco inspired-pylons, ornate bridge railings, cantilevered sidewalks, and architectural treatment of the substructure."
  • Hart Park - Orange CA
    Hart Park in Orange, California, was created in the 1930s by the City of Orange with the help of the State Emergency Relief Agency (SERA) and the federal Works Progress Administration (WPA). Orange City Park was the town’s first park. In 1935, a proposal was submitted for funding to build Orange City Park with $30,963 from the WPA for relief labor and $12,362 in local funds for materials, employing 66 men for 11 months. The proposal was approved in early 1936 and the work probably continued for the next two years, given the extensive improvements made. This was part...
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