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  • Rock Creek Park: Improvements - Washington DC
    The New Deal contributed substantially to the betterment of Rock Creek Park in the 1930s.  This involved a number of federal agencies. Rock Creek Park is a key greenway in the District of Columbia and, at 1750 acres, is almost twice the size of Central Park in New York.  It was established by Congress in 1890, making it officially a National Park at the time.  It featured prominently in the far-reaching plans for the District of Columbia by the McMillan Commission in 1901-02 and the Olmsted Brothers report of 1918, which envisioned a major park with a scenic parkway running through it. In...
  • CCC Camp Zigzag (Zigzag Ranger Station), Mount Hood National Forest - Zigzag OR
    Camp Zigzag, near Zigzag, Oregon in Clackamas County, was the chief Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) camp in the Mount Hood National Forest, operating from 1933 to 1942.  Several of the CCC buildings are still in place and in use at the site, which is now one of four US Forest Service district Ranger Stations in the Mt. Hood National Forest.. Some of the buildings at Camp Zigzag predate the CCC, but most were built by CCC workers and are still standing and in use: the Ranger's Office, Carpenter Shop, Bunkhouse Residence, Ranger's Residence, Gas House, Fire Warehouse, Road and Trails Warehouse,...
  • Post Office (former) - Gallup NM
    "This building was formerly the Gallup Post Office. It was constructed as part of the WPA project and still has the original carved beamed ceilings that are quite unique. This whole building is unique in that it exhibits a mix of several architectural styles, including Mediterranean, Decorative Brick Commercial and Spanish Pueblo Revival. This eclectic approach works very well, however, as the blond brick building is listed in the National Register as being significant architecturally as well as for its association with the civic history of Gallup. Warren Rollins created three large paintings of Indian scenes which hung in this building. Those...
  • Sims Bridge - Sims CA
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) built a one-lane suspension bridge over the Upper Sacramento River in September 1933 under the supervision of the US Forest Service.  It may well have been the first major construction project completed by the CCC in the country.  A plaque next to the bridge notes that Raymond Huber, who supervised the project, was given a plan of a 160-foot suspension bridge but no instructions on how to go about construction; so the crew made its own plans as it went along.  The initial purpose of the bridge was to provide access to the east side of the...
  • Triborough (RFK) Bridge - New York NY
    The Triborough bridge linking up Queens, the Bronx, and Manhattan over East River, is still known to New Yorkers by that name, even though it was officially renamed the Robert F. Kennedy Bridge in 2008. The Triborough Bridge is one of three major bridges, along with the Henry Hudson and the Bronx-Whitestone, built during the New Deal era to link the boroughs of Manhattan, Queens and the Bronx, and tie together the expanding highway system in and out of New York City.  Construction on the Triborough bridge began in 1929, but the Depression soon slowed progress on the project. In 1933, Robert Moses, head...
  • Bourne Bridge - Bourne MA
    The Bourne Bridge across the Cape Cod canal was built for the US Army Corps of Engineers, with funding from the Public Works Administration (PWA). It was part of a very large project to improve the canal and add three bridges across it; the PWA allotment was $6,138,000 for the entire project.  (Short & Stanley-Brown 1939) The project began in 1933 and the bridge opened in 1935. The contractor was American Bridge Company of New York, New York and the engineering was done by Fay, Spofford, and Thorndike of Boston, Massachusetts (historicbridges.com) The Bourne Bridge won the American Institute of Steel Construction's Class "A" Award...
  • City Hall - Santa Maria CA
    Santa Maria City Hall is a lovely example of Mission Revival architecture, which includes a tower, a walled courtyard and blue tile work in the entrance corridor. It was designed by local architects Louis Noiré Crawford and Francis Parsons.  Gaylord Jones custom built furniture for the city council chamber. The building cost $68,000 and funding came from the Public Works Administration (PWA) of the New Deal. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) worked on the grounds of city hall in 1935, spending $13,600. There is a cornerstone with the date of construction, an historical landmark plaque by the city and a public storyboard of...
  • San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge - San Francisco CA and Oakland CA
    The San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, one of the most famous bridges in the world and the key transportation link in the Bay Area, was built under the New Deal with funding from the Reconstruction Finance Corporation (RFC). The 8-mile long bridge (43,500 feet) consists of two parts, both anchored to Yerba Buena Island in the middle of San Francisco Bay.  The western half is an elegant suspension bridge (whose beauty has always suffered by comparison with the Golden Gate Bridge, but gained a delightful electronic light show in the 2010s). The longer  eastern half was a classic cantilever bridge, ungainly but...
  • General Improvements - Yosemite National Park CA
    The New Deal vastly improved Yosemite National Park in California, which has long been the showpiece of the national park system.  Several federal agencies operated in the park from 1933 to 1942, under the general supervision of the National Park Service: the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), Public Works Administration (PWA), and Bureau of Public Roads (BPR), plus the short-lived Civil Works Administration (CWA)  (December 1933 to April 1934). Major works around Yosemite are detailed in the various site pages listed on the right. Nevertheless, some of the immense amount of work done during the New Deal cannot be pinpointed, so we...
  • Codornices Park Tennis and Handball Courts - Berkeley CA
    The Civil Works Administration (CWA) built tennis and handball courts at Codornices Park – most of which lies on the east side of Euclid Road and is accessed via a pedestrian tunnel from the ball courts, which are on the west side of the road.  The tennis and handball courts adjoin the more famous Berkeley Rose Garden.  The CWA was the short-lived predecessor (1933-34) to the better known Works Progress Administration (WPA), which constructed the Rose Garden.  It is likely that the CWA began the work for the Rose Garden by creating the semi-circular hollow out of the valley cut by Codornices...
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