U.S. Custom House – Naco AZ

Description

“The Custom House at Naco was constructed in 1936 with funds from the Public Works Administration. Louis Simon, architect for the Public Buildings Branch of the Treasury Department, designed the Custom House in the Pueblo Revival style. The two-story building is an outstanding example of this style and includes southwestern features of battered (sloped) and rounded walls, parapets, rough-hewn rafters and vigas, waterspouts, window lintels, and a decorative ladder. In addition to its fine artistry and historic integrity, the building is the only Custom House on the Arizona border designed in the Pueblo Revival style.”

Source notes

"The New Deal in Arizona: Connections to Our Historic Landscape," University of Arizona, The New Deal in Arizona Chapter of the National New Deal Preservation Association. 
http://www.library.arizona.edu/newdeal/map.html

Quote taken from (and photos available at): http://content.library.arizona.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/NewDeal/id/203

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Location Info


106 D St.
Naco, AZ

Coordinates: 31.335138, -109.948081

2 comments on “U.S. Custom House – Naco AZ

  1. Linda Wallace

    My Grandfather, Leopoldo Montero, Salcedo, worked as a Mexican Customs Clerk in the 1930’s.

  2. What is the orientation (compass heading) of the original port of entry?
    Years ago I visited the facility and during my discussion with the assigned CBP personnel I learned that the port lies on a “compass heading” which puts the original inspection lane directly facing the sun.

    While a mute point overall, as well as the fact that the original was listed on a historic, protected list, I admit, it really made viewing approaching traffic difficult to see until they had arrived up close and personnel in the lane adjacent to the inspection booth.

    Also, there was quite a “snow bird” RV park (concrete pads, water and sewer hookups all enclosed by a chain link fence. Does it still existed?

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