North Grand Island Bridge – Grand Island NY

Description

What is now the northbound span of the North Grand Island Bridge (as well as the southbound span of the South Grand Island Bridge) was constructed as a New Deal project in 1933-5, funded by a Reconstruction Finance Corporation (RFC) loan.

“The Swartz bill, drafted by Commissioner Robert Moses, state representative of the Reconstruction Finance Corporation, passed the Legislature in 1933. This measure paved the way for the $2,880,000 loan from the R. F. C. Robert Moses became an enthusiastic supporter of the bridge. Former Governor Alfred E. Smith gave his active support to the project, as did Speaker Joseph A. McGinnus. The ground was broken for the south bridge on October 28, 1933. At long last, in early July 1935, the bridges were completed. After more than a century of talk and discussion Grand Island was connected to the mainland of the United States, not by one, but by two bridges.”

Source notes

The New York Times: "REVIVAL AT NIAGARA: Developments at Grand Island Adding to Accessibility and Beauties of Area," July 14, 1935 (pg. 140)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Grand_Island_Bridge

http://www.isledegrande.com/gihist.htm (accessed Apr. 2018)

Project originally submitted by Evan Kalish on April 3, 2018.

We welcome contributions of additional information on any New Deal project site.

SUBMIT MORE INFORMATION OR PHOTOGRAPHS FOR THIS SITE

Location Info


I-190
Grand Island, NY

Coordinates: 43.068441, -78.990586

Leave a Reply

Before leaving a comment, please note:

  • Comments allow viewers to share information with others or alert us to errors or changes in a New Deal site.
  • We are not involved in the management of New Deal sites and have no information about visits, hours or rentals.
  • This page shows all the information we have for this site; if you have new information or photos to share, click below.

SUBMIT MORE INFORMATION OR PHOTOGRAPHS FOR THIS SITE

We welcome contributions of additional information on any New Deal project site.

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.