Mark Twain Memorial Bridge (demolished) – Hannibal MO to IL

Description

The former Mark Twain Memorial Bridge, spanning the Mississippi River between Hannibal, Missouri and Illinois, was constructed as a Public Works Administration (P.W.A.) project.

A preserved portion of the old Mark Twain Memorial Bridge remains on the west bank of the Mississippi River in the Cardiff Hill Overlook Park, A plaque exists in some concrete railing preserved in place and notes its Federal Emergency funding and was Project No. 3624. The bridge was formally dedicated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. It served traffic from 1936 to 2000 when it was demolished and replaced by a truss bridge to the north to accommodate I-72 traffic.

Bridgehunter.com give additional details:

Opened Sept. 4, 1936; tolls removed Oct. 30, 1940; rehabilitated 1982; replaced and demolished 2000.
Builders:
Mt. Vernon Bridge Co. of Mt. Vernon, Ohio (Superstructure)
Sverdrup & Parcel of St. Louis, Missouri (Designer)
Union Bridge Co. of Buffalo, New York & Athens, Pennsylvania
(Substructure)
Design:
Subdivided Warren continuous through truss
Dimensions:
Length of largest span: 626.8 ft.
Total length: 3,507.0 ft. (0.7 mi.)
Deck width: 23.9 ft.
Vertical clearance above deck: 14.2 ft.

Source notes

https://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WMQ6EK

Bridgehunter.com

Project originally submitted by Douglass Halvorsen on February 15, 2018.

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Location Info


I-72
Hannibal, Missouri 63401

Location notes: Coordinates of plaque: 39.713367 N, -91.358017 W (north of the Tom Sawyer statue in the Cardiff Hill Overlook Park)

Coordinates: 39.7201012, -91.358102

One comment on “Mark Twain Memorial Bridge (demolished) – Hannibal MO to IL

  1. Elizabeth. Davis

    I was born in September 1936, and grew up in New Canton, on the Illinois side of the Mark Twain bridge, about 20 miles away. I vividly remember my parents taking about the opening of the bridge. There were fireworks and a huge celebration. It was a great asset to the nearby communities. I remember the WPA and those who worked. It was a great program for the time, and the communities benefited, and the country as well.

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