District Wharf and Engine Building – Washington DC

Description

The district wharf on the Potomac River near Maine Avenue on the southwest waterfront, as well as the original “engine building” (white structure ), was built under the New Deal. The wharf is the site of the rebuilt Maine Avenue Fish Market.

Apparently, the funding came from the Public Works Administration (PWA).  Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) enrollees participated the construction – and it seems likely the Works Progress Administration (WPA) was also involved, given the nearby work by the WPA along the southwestern waterfront.

The brief history on the DC wharf’s website calls it the “30s Renaissance”:

“During the 1930s, the Southwest Waterfront underwent a renaissance, as plans to beautify the harbor were realized. The waterfront would continue its successful cargo business, supported by the municipal fish market and farmer’s market. As part of this movement to ‘give the city back its waterfront,’ Water Street’s name was changed to Maine Avenue in 1938 and plans were developed to transform it into a 160-foot boulevard.”

 

 

 

Source notes

https://www.wharfdc.com/wharf/history/

 

Project originally submitted by Robert Krause on October 22, 2013.
Additional contributions by Richard A Walker.

We welcome contributions of additional information on any New Deal project site.

SUBMIT MORE INFORMATION OR PHOTOGRAPHS FOR THIS SITE

Location Info


Maine Ave, S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20024

Coordinates: 38.8811, -77.0280

Leave a Reply

Before leaving a comment, please note:

  • Comments allow viewers to share information with others or alert us to errors or changes in a New Deal site.
  • We are not involved in the management of New Deal sites and have no information about visits, hours or rentals.
  • This page shows all the information we have for this site; if you have new information or photos to share, click below.

SUBMIT MORE INFORMATION OR PHOTOGRAPHS FOR THIS SITE

We welcome contributions of additional information on any New Deal project site.

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.