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  • Tacoma County Bridges - Tacoma WA
    One of many PWA and WPA projects in Washington state: "$314,768 was allocated for the replacement and repairing of 11 bridges in Tacoma/ Pierce County. All of the bridges were either already shut down or were scheduled to be shut down for safety reasons. The structures were needed to maintain normal flow of traffic in Tacoma."
  • Tacoma Narrows Bridge (former) - Tacoma WA
    "The bridge connects Tacoma to areas such as Gig Harbor on the Kitsap Peninsula. Funded by the Public Works Administration (PWA), it was 2,800 feet between the two the two towers. “Everyone marveled, at the gossamer of a structure so long”, Murray Morgan said the bridge. It was indeed a long and skinny structure, but that was the problem. In 1940 the bridge was hit with bad cross winds and after some violent twisting and shaking it broke. It took ten years to get the bridge back, partly due to the limited resources because of WWII. The rebuilt bridge stands...
  • Taft Sidewalks - CA
    Taft received WPA sidewalks.
  • Tamazulapa Rio Bridge - Tiucal Guatamala
    The November 1935 issue of California Highway & Public Works reported on New Deal work in the country of Guatamala. "PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT has approved a program of bridge construction work on the route of the Inter-American highway in Central America, the U.S. Bureau of Public Roads in charge of activities on the highway announces, Congress in June 1934, appropriated $1,000,000 to meet such expenses as the President in his discretion may deem necessary to enable the United States to cooperate with the several governments, members of the Pan-American Union, in connection with survey and construction of the proposed Inter-American Highway, As...
  • Taughannock Falls State Park - Trumansburg NY
    An article in The Ithaca Journal identified numerous Civil Works Administration (CWA) efforts in Tompkins County, New York, "improvement at Taughannock Falls." The Works Progress Administration (WPA) also conducted work at Taughannock Falls State Park. Per The Nature of New York: For example, a WPA camp at Stony Brook State Park constructed roads and trails, planted trees, and improved stream banks. The WPA undertook similar work in Taughannock Falls State Park on Cayuga Lake.
  • Taylor Avenue Improvements - Bronx NY
    The federal Work Projects Administration put many men to work starting in 1935 with a Bronx street repair and maintenance project along roads throughout the borough. The streets, many of which in New York City were still unpaved, were surfaced with penetrated macadam. Roads improved included three modest stretches of Taylor Avenue: (a) between Lacombe and 'Sound View' Avenues; (b) between Watson and Gleason Avenues; and (c) between East Tremont and Van Nest Avenues.
  • Taylor Street Bridge Improvements - Montpelier VT
    The Works Progress Administration (W.P.A.) conducted improvement work on many of Montpelier's steel bridges, including painting the Taylor Street bridge in 1935.
  • Tekamah City Bridge - Tekamah NE
    The Nebraska Department of Roads and Irrigation’s 1933-34 Biennial Report includes two photographs of the old Tekamah City Bridge, a tired looking Pratt half-hip pony truss, and two views of the attractive new concrete structure that replaced it. The report singles out the Tekamah Bridge and a Dodge County underpass, describing them as “monolithic concrete structures of solid concrete without joints from the bottom of one footing, up and over the span, and down to the bottom of the other footing.” It continues that “the slab or deck takes the form of a very flat arch with a comparatively thin...
  • Telephone Canyon Road Development - Laramie WY
    Civil Works Administration projects sponsored by the Wyoming's state highway department included "the widening and backsloping of portions of the Telephone Canyon Road east of Laramie." I-80 approximately follows this route.
  • Temple Street Bridge - Los Angeles CA
    The PWA built this large concrete bridge over Figueroa St.
  • Tenth Avenue Repairs and Improvements - Huntington WV
    The Works Progress Administration completed repairs and improvements on Tenth Avenue in Huntington, Cabell County. The work consisted of "Relaying old pavement and constructing concrete base on Tenth avenue, Huntington.”
  • Tenth Street NE Improvements - Washington DC
    The Works Progress Administration (WPA) improved a segment of Tenth Street NE, from Michigan Avenue to Taylor Street. This was a WPA curb and gutter project: “The improvement of this roadway provided a main thoroughfare to the private developments and business in this vicinity.”
  • Tenth Street NW Improvements - Washington DC
    The Works Progress Administration (WPA) carried out pavement repair and other, unspecified improvements to a segment of Tenth Street NW, from Constitution Avenue to Pennsylvania Avenue, in 1935-36.   The road was “widened to conform with the design of the Triangle area, and repaved with sheet asphalt pavement.”   The work was part of a $949,496 WPA allotment for DC roadwork for fiscal year 1936.   The work is likely still extant, but invisible beneath subsequent paving.    
  • Tenth Street Paving - Fairmont WV
    The Works Progress Administration completed a project in Fairmont, West Virginia consisting of “Paving Tenth Street with concrete from Garten Avenue to Fairmont Avenue.”
  • Texas City Dike Improvements - Texas City TX
    Authorized by the River and Harbor Act of 1913, the Texas City Dike was to divert the flow of silt from the Texas City Ship Channel by steering the waters of Galveston Bay out to the Gulf of Mexico. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Galveston District constructed the first version of the dike in 1915 using timber pile construction. Dredging material from the Texas City Ship Channel was deposited on top of the timber pile, but the material eventually washed away. The Corps added a rubble-mound formation to the supplement the existing dike in 1931-1932 to stop the erosion. Around...
  • Texas State Highway 95 - Bastrop TX
    The February 9, 1939 issue of the Bastrop Advertiser published a letter from Texas Senator Albert Stone advising Bastrop residents that bids would soon be accepted for the grading and drainage structure for nine miles of Texas State Highway 95 starting eight miles south of Elgin, near Sayersville, to Bastrop. The road had already been improved from Elgin to Sayersville and this would complete the connection to Bastrop. The Works Progress Administration was funding the $109,000 relief project with 30% of the cost expected to be spent on labor.
  • Thayer Memorial Bridge - Waterville ME
    "The Gilman Street Bridge, since named “Thayer Memorial Bridge” , which was undertaken as a C. W. A. project in 1933 was completed under F. E. R. A. early in 1934. Although the cost of this project exceeded the estimate by several thousand dollars, due to a sharp advance in the price of materials after construction started and to difficult working conditions because of extremely cold weather, it is a beautiful, well constructed and useful memorial to the vision and ability of the late Mayor Thayer to plan and bring to pass this project which will be an everlasting benefit...
  • The Pentagon: Access Roads - Arlington VA
    The Pentagon is America’s Department of Defense headquarters and the largest office building in the world.  It was constructed from August 1941 to January 1943 in order to centralize the administration of the U.S. armed services during World War II.   The site of the Pentagon had previously been a barren area, so the Public Roads Administration, a division of the New Deal’s Federal Works Agency (FWA), supervised a “$7 million network of highways to serve the and adjacent areas” (Sunday Star, 1942). While it may not appear to be a typical New Deal public works project, the Pentagon was built...
  • Theriot Avenue Improvements - Bronx NY
    The federal Work Projects Administration put many men to work starting in 1935 with a Bronx street repair and maintenance project along roads throughout the borough. The streets, many of which in New York City were still unpaved, were surfaced with penetrated macadam. Roads improved included a modest stretch of Theriot Avenue in the Clason Point neighborhood of the Bronx from Randall Ave. to Seward Ave.
  • Third Avenue South Improvements - Birmingham AL
    The federal Works Progress Administration (WPA) worked to improve Third Avenue South in Birmingham, Alabama, along stretches of the road co-designated as U.S. 78.
  • Third Street NW Improvements - Washington DC
    The Public Works Administration (PWA) improved a segment of Third Street NW. from Constitution Avenue to C Street. PWA funded the construction of a retaining wall on the east side of Third Street. This was part of several road alteration projects to accommodate the new Municipal Center building (also a PWA-funded project).
  • Thirteenth and G Street NE Resurfacing - Washington DC
    Work: A Journal of Progress reported that the Works Progress Administration (WPA) had completed street resurfacing in the vicinity of 13th and G Streets NE in 1936. This would have been part of the nearly $1 million program of street repairs carried out by the WPA that year. The work is likely still extant, but invisible beneath subsequent repavings.
  • Thirteenth Street NW Improvements - Washington DC
    The Works Progress Administration (WPA) carried out pavement repair and other improvements to a segment of Thirteenth Street NW, from Florida Avenue to Euclid Street, in 1935-36.   “The roadway of Thirteenth Street NW, from Florida Avenue to Euclid Street, was widened and paved. The new concrete pavement was treated with an emulsion used for darkening concrete so as to eliminate the glare.”   The work was part of the $949,496 WPA allotment for DC roadwork for fiscal year 1936.   The work is likely still extant, but invisible beneath subsequent repavings.        
  • Thirty-Fifth, Carpenter, and Pope Streets SE Road Work - Washington DC
    In 1940, the Works Progress Administration (WPA) built new roadways at 35th, Carpenter, and Pope streets in the district's southeast quadrant. This project was part of a massive New Deal program of street paving and upgrades around the city of Washington DC.  Most such work is invisible today beneath subsequent repavings.  
  • Thirty-first Street NW Improvements - Washington DC
    The Works Progress Administration (WPA) improved a segment of Thirty-first Street NW from Utah Avenue to Worthington Street. This was a WPA curb and gutter project: “This roadway, together with the roadway of Barnaby Street… constitute main thoroughfares to the recent development of the subdivision known as Barnaby Woods.”
  • Thirty-fourth Street Improvements - Washington DC
    The Works Progress Administration (WPA) improved a segment of Thirty-fourth Street from Alabama Avenue to U Street. The WPA improved this road with recycled material and the “laying of a thin blanket of bituminous material.” It involved “approximately 4,500 square yards.”  
  • Thomas Circle Underpass - Washington DC
    Thomas Circle is a traffic circle at the junction of Massachusetts Avenue, Vermont Avenue, 14th Street, and M Street, NW.  The through lanes of Massachusetts Ave. pass under Thomas Circle. That underpass was constructed in 1938-40, apparently with federal support from the Public Works Administration (PWA).
  • Thomas Mill Covered Bridge - Philadelphia PA
    Philadelphia's only covered bridge, which spans Wissahickon Creek in Wissahickon Valley Park, was "rebuilt as part of the Works Progress Administration."
  • Thomas Street Paving - Woonsocket RI
    Woonsocket, RI: A Centennial History, states: The Woonsocket Call of September 28, 1935, reported that "work was started on the first five WPA projects in Woonsocket, giving employment to 300 men." Logee and Larch Streets and Rhodes Avenue were graded; Thomas Street was paved; and Cass Park athletic fields were completed.
  • Thoroughfare Neck Road - Townsend DE
    Delaware utilized substantial federal resources in developing and improving its road network during the Great Depression. Among the dozens of projects undertaken by the federal Civil Works Administration (C.W.A.) during 1934 was construction along Thoroughfare Neck Road at the Cedar Swamp Wildlife Area. An average of 1,410 were put to work each week during 1934 as a result of the CWA’s road, sidewalk, bridge, and other related infrastructure efforts in Delaware.  
  • Three Mile Point Road Improvements - Chaumont NY
    The Cape Vincent Eagle reported that the federal Works Progress Administration (WPA) was to improve several roads to the Lake Ontario shore in the Three Mile Bay area of Jefferson County, New York, during the summer of 1939. Roads included that "from the Chaumont-Three Mile Bay state highway 2.4 southeasterly to an improved town road."
  • Tibes Road Improvements - Ponce PR
    The Puerto Rico Emergency Relief Administration carried out repair and maintenance work in Tibes in Ponce.
  • Ticonic Bridge - Waterville/Winslow ME
    The Ticonic bridge is a 575 Foot concrete and steel I beam structure that carries route 201 over the Kennebec River and connects Waterville and Winslow. The bridge was one of 26 bridges that were badly damaged or destroyed by a 500 year flood in March 1936. A large piece of ice hit one of the stone piers causing two of the bridge spans to crash into the river. A state highway commission report notes that the reconstruction of these bridges were U.S. Works Program Flood Relief projects and were handled under the jurisdiction of the Bureau of Public Roads, U.S....
  • Timber Road - Duncan Township MO
    The Works Progress Administration (WPA) conducted a rural road development project in Sullivan County, Missouri: "in Duncan township from the end of present gravel road three miles south of Reger west to the Taylor Township line." This is consistent with Timber Road. Here, the project is assigned as Milan as much of the road resides within Milan's 63556 ZIP code.
  • Titus Flats Road Improvements - Ithaca NY
    An article in The Ithaca Journal identified numerous Civil Works Administration (CWA) efforts in Ithaca, New York, including "road grading in Titus Flats."
  • Todt Hill Road Paving - Staten Island NY
    The stretch of Todt Hill Road in Staten Island, New York between Schmidts Lane and Ocean Terrace was paved and widened as part of a sponsored federal WPA project during the 1930s.
  • Toiyabe National Forest Improvements - Mount Charleston NV
    “By the spring of 1936, the CCC continued where they left off in 1934. Crews built a water system for the Kyle Canyon Campground, the Rainbow Canyon summer-home area, the Kyle Canyon Guard Station, and the Air Force Base Rest Camp. Considerable time was also spent cleaning up collapsed CCC barracks destroyed by devastating storms during the previous winter…Once the camp was operational, the CCC began constructing Deer Creek Road into Lee Canyon and building trails to Little Falls and Mount Baldy.” --The Civilian Conservation Corps in Nevada
  • Tok Cutoff (Nabesna Road) - Gulkana AK
    The New Deal helped build the first road from Gulkana to Nabesna in 1933-34. About half of this 107 mile section was improved to a level that would allow automobile traffic (probably up to the intersection at Slana). The purpose was to provide access to the Nabesna mining district from the Richardson highway, which was the main access road to the coast at the time.  Funding came from the Public Works Administration (PWA) and the Federal Emergency Relief Administration (FERA). Some of the work was done by private contractors under the Alaska Roads Commission and some by FERA relief workers, but...
  • Tomas de Castro Road Construction - Caguas PR
    The Civil Works Administration and the Puerto Rico Emergency Relief Administration carried out new road construction on Tomas de Castro Road in Caguas.
  • Tompkins Avenue Grade Separation - Staten Island NY
    A railway-crossing bridge carrying Tompkins Avenue was built during the mid-1930s as part of a massive grade separation project along what was then the South Beach Branch of the Staten Island Railway. The line has long since been abandoned (as the line was discontinued in 1953) and the space beneath the bridge has been filled in. Traces of the bridge structure can be seen by way of the different cement used along 260 feet of Tompkins Avenue, and the dropoff from Tompkins Avenue to the west. The Public Works Administration (PWA) provided a $1.46 million grant for the $6 million grade crossing elimination project, which included...
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