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  • University of South Carolina - Columbia SC
    The University of South Carolina was the beneficiary of a large influx of New Deal funds from various agencies throughout the Great Depression. In "The Prosperity of the Depression," the university's website writes the following with regard to this era of the campus's history: "It is interesting to note that almost as many buildings were built during the Depression as during the period 1908-1930. A world economic crisis occurred in 1929, the harbinger of the Great Depression. Even before that, in 1927, state appropriations for permanent improvements had ended. On the one hand, the Great Depression meant severe financial constraints for the...
  • University of Southern Mississippi Improvements - Hattiesburg MS
    The State Teachers College in Hattiesburg received funding from ERA in 1934 and 1935 for improvements and repair to several buildings on campus. The school received $28,532.89 for repairing the hospital building, redecorating the interior of the library, renovating four campus cottages, placing flood-lights on the athletic field, refinishing floors in the president's home, and enlargements and alteration of the demonstration school gymnasium along with brick veneering of the exterior. the library was enlarged and improved. At least two of the buildings (president's home and demonstration gymnasium) are extant.
  • University of Tampa: Plant Hall Improvements - Tampa FL
    Plant Hall was formerly known as the Tampa Bay Hotel. It was built in the late 19th century. By the 1930s it was in disrepair until the WPA restored the building and converted it into use by the University of Tampa. One wing of Plant Hall now houses the Henry B. Plant Museum.
  • University of Texas at Austin: Andrews Dormitory - Austin TX
    The student body of the University of Texas increased from 6,000 in 1920 to 10,000 in 1930, necessitating an extensive building program for the university. The university added Andrews Dormitory for women and Roberts Dormitory for men in 1936. The Public Works Administration provided a grant of $114,000 and a loan of $354,000 for these two buildings of which $239,000 went to build Andrews. The university named Andrews Dormitory for Jessie Andrews, the first woman to graduate from UT (1886). Andrews was the third dormitory built for women on-campus. It opened in September 1936 to house approximately 118 students. The building...
  • University of Texas at Austin: Carothers Dormitory - Austin TX
    "The student body of the University of Texas increased from 6,000 in 1920 to 10,000 in 1930, necessitating an extensive building program for the university. Carothers Dormitory for girls was one of the first buildings constructed. It is three stories and a basement in height and provides 61 double bedrooms, living room, dining room, matron's suite, staff bedrooms, and the necessary kitchens and service rooms. The building is semi-fireproof, the exterior walls being brick trimmed with stone and stucco. It was completed in March 1937 at a construction cost of $250,572 and a project cost of $264,923."
  • University of Texas at Austin: Hill Hall - Austin TX
    Beginning in 1939, the university housed its athletes in Hill Hall. The five story building (including basement) is of Spanish Renaissance style with red roof and tan bricks. The Public Works Administration provided a grant of $46,636 and a loan of $57,000 to cover the cost of construction. When originally opened the building housed 84 men. Hill Hall is named for Dr. Homer Barksdale Hill of Austin who volunteered to treat UT athletes from 1893 until his death on July 18, 1923. As its athletic programs grew, the university added Moore Hall in 1955, just south of Hill Hall and connected to...
  • University of Texas at Austin: Main Building and Library - Austin TX
    The University of Texas opened on September 15, 1883 with the completion of its Victorian style main building. The university was funded by a combination of state appropriations and annual distributions from the Permanent University Fund (PUF), an endowment of 2.1 million acres of land in West Texas. Initially, the PUF provided minimal income from leasing the land for grazing cattle, but when the first oil was discovered on the land on May 28, 1923, the university was set to receive a windfall. However, it was not until 1930, that all the details were worked out on how the money...
  • University of Texas at Austin: Prather Dormitory - Austin TX
    Due in part to the growing number of men returning to college after World War I, the student body of the University of Texas at Austin increased from 6,000 in 1920 to 10,000 in 1930, necessitating an extensive building program for the university. Plans for Prather Dormitory for men were approved by the Board of Regents in September 1935. The Public Works Administration funded the construction of the building with a grant of $110,454 and loan of $135,000. The cornerstone of the building marks the building as "Project No. 9229-Y of the Federal Emergency Administration of Public Works." Now called Prather Residence...
  • University of Texas at Austin: Roberts Dormitory - Austin TX
    The student body of the University of Texas increased from 6,000 in 1920 to 10,000 in 1930, necessitating an extensive building program for the university. The university added Andrews Dormitory for women and Roberts Dormitory for men in 1936. The Public Works Administration provided a grant of $114,000 and a loan of $354,000 for these two buildings of which $220,000 went to build Roberts. The university named Roberts Dormitory in honor of Oran Milo Roberts who served as Governor of Texas from 1878 to 1883. The building is of Spanish Renaissance style architecture with cream bricks and a red tile roof...
  • University of Texas at Austin: Texas Memorial Museum - Austin TX
    As part of the planning for the 1936 Texas Centennial, academics, citizens and other politicians desired to create a state museum for Texas. They wanted the museum to contribute to the conservation of the historic treasures of Texas and also to the educational system of the state. The American Legion Texas Centennial Committee, The University of Texas at Austin and Texas Congressman James "Buck" Buchanan worked together to secure $300,000 from the Public Works Administration for the Texas Memorial Museum. In addition, the Legislature of the State of Texas appropriated $225,000 for furnishing and equipping the museum and for gathering and...
  • University of Texas at El Paso, Dormitories - El Paso TX
    The PWA built two dormitories in 1936 for what was then called the Texas College of Mines and Metallurgy. The two dorms are Benedict and Worrell Halls, both of which are still standing. The school's newspaper, The Prospector, reported in April 1936 that "Construction started April 15, 1936 on the two PWA allocated dormitories for 102 men and women students," and that school officials believed the new dormitories would help attract more and stronger students to the school.
  • University of Texas: Brazos House (demolished) - Arlington TX
    Originally called Davis Hall, this building was a PWA project for a dormitory at North Texas Agricultural College in Arlington, TX. The building is now known as Brazos House and the college is now known as the University of Texas at Arlington. It was dedicated in 1936. Brazos House has been demolished and turned into a campus park.
  • University of Utah - Salt Lake City UT
    Multiple building construction projects were undertaken at the University of Utah during the Great Depression. The old library (now Crocker Science Center) and Einar Nielsen Fieldhouse are both Public Works Administration (PWA) projects that are still in use. Carlson Hall, another PWA construction, has since been demolished. The present status of a fourth building, the Seismograph Building, is presently unknown to Living New Deal. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) was involved with the creation of artwork at the old library. From a 2013 retrospective on Carlson Hall, the women's dormitory: "After bequest to the U, the University administration approached the...
  • University of Utah: Bureau of Mines Building (demolished) - Salt Lake City UT
    The Public Works Administration paid for the construction of the United States Bureau of Mines building on the University of Utah campus in 1939-40.  It was designed by Cannon and Mullen architects.  The building was demolished recently to make way for the new Frederick Albert Sutton building of the College of Mines & Earth Sciences – or, more specifically, the parking garage for the Sutton complex. In 1938, the land had been deeded to the U. S. Government by the University of Utah, so a federal facility could be built on the campus.  In 1981, the Bureau of Mines property was deeded back to the university, along...
  • University of Utah: Carlson Hall (demolished) - Salt Lake City UT
    Carlson Hall, formerly located at the southwest corner of the University of Utah campus, served multiple roles over the years. Originally constructed as a women’s dorm, the building later housed a dining room, classrooms, and offices. The building was funded by the Federal Emergency Administration of Public Works (see photo on plaque). It was demolished ca. 2013. The Quinney School of Law is located here now. The have a wonderful tribute to Carlson Hall inside the first floor front door (in a nook accross from the First Floor information desk). This includes the New Deal funding information, an original brick, a...
  • University of Utah: Einar Nielsen Fieldhouse - Salt Lake City UT
    The old fieldhouse, built in 1939, was home to the University of Utah basketball team for thirty years. It was built with a combination of bonded debt by the university and Public Works Administration (PWA) funds.   It appears to be used for intermural athletics today.  
  • University of Utah: Seismograph Building (demolished) - Salt Lake City UT
    The Public Works Administration paid for a seismograph building on the campus of the University of Utah.  It sat next to the old Bureau of Mines building.  Both were demolished to make way for the Frederick Albert Sutton building for the College of Mines and Earth Sciences, opened in 2009.  (They were located behind the present Sutton Building where the parking garage now stands).
  • University of Utah: Thomas Library (Crocker Science Center) - Salt Lake City UT
    The building was designed by the firm of Ashton & Evans and constructed as a PWA project in 1935. In 1969, a new library was built on campus and the Thomas Building was converted into the Utah Museum of Natural History, which recently moved to a new home on the eastern flank of the university. The structure was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1978. The former George Thomas Library is being converted to the Crocker Science Center (with major additions) as of 2016-17. Of the $20,000,000 spent in Utah by the Public Works Administration (PWA) for public works projects, the "most imposing" of...
  • University of Vermont: Converse Hall South Wing Remodel - Burlington VT
    The National Youth Administration (NYA) renovated and remodeled the south wing of Converse Hall at the University of Vermont. The newly remodeled wing served as cooperative living quarters for male students. Pictured with the NYA sign is Lee Arthur, the supervisor of the project.
  • University of Vermont: Mabel Louise Southwick Memorial Building - Burlington VT
    "The Mabel Louise Southwick Building is the women's recreation building at the university. It is T-shaped in plan and is two stories and a basement in height. The basement contains a combination recreation hall and auditorium with a large stage, locker and utility rooms. Lounges and sitting rooms occupy the first floor. On the second floor are meeting rooms and a recreation hall with a small stage. The structure is fireproof throughout, the exterior walls being red brick trimmed with marble. It has a volume of 458,000 cubic feet and was completed in November 1936 at a construction cost of $263,237...
  • University of Vermont: Pease Mural - Burlington VT
    The Burlington-born artist Raymond Pease was commissioned by the Public Works of Art Program to paint a mural at Perkins Hall at the University of Vermont. The mural was covered with drywall during renovations in 1992. It was rediscovered in 2019 at Perkins Hall and it will be relocated to the Perkins Geology Museum.
  • University of Virginia: Alderman Library - Charlottesville VA
    "The attendance at the University of Virginia had risen to 2,700 students and the accommodations for the library in the rotunda building had become entirely inadequate. The university, accordingly, secured a loan and grant from the P.W.A. and erected the new 'Alderman Library' building. Due to great differences of level on the site, the building is two stories high on the front and five stories in the rear. The basement contains a receiving room and general storage. On the first floor are offices, archives, and stack space. The second floor is occupied by reserve book rooms, rooms for public documents, and...
  • University of Washington Campus - Seattle WA
    A WPA press release from Dec. 1937 stated: "The finishing touches to the creation of what is said will be the most beautiful college campus in tho west will begin this week with the opening operations of a new Works Progress Administration project. The plans designed, under a series of projects of which this is the culminating one, will give the University of Washington a campus second to none in boauty of landscape, according to the university buildings and grounds engineers. The WPA grant for the present project is the largest single federal allotment to the university and, according to present estimates,...
  • University of Wisconsin: Arboretum - Madison WI
    Men of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) worked from 1934 to 1941 on the Arboretum of University of Wisconsin Madison, providing the majority of the labor needed to establish the ecological communities that make up the Arboretum. This was accomplished by excavating and moving land to return farmland to it’s natural condition as well as reintroducing native plants. Between 1900-1920 there were many civic leaders of the fast-growing city of Madison, Wisconsin interested in returning the countryside to it’s natural glory. These leaders recognized the importance of the conservation of open spaces for the citizens of the city. To ensure the...
  • University of Wyoming Recreation Camp (demolished): Laboratory Building - Centennial WY
    The Works Progress Administration constructed a university laboratory building in Centennial, Albany County. The camp had been founded near Mullen Creek in 1935 by a CCC camp (possibly F-36). The University of Wyoming later used the facility as a recreation camp. During WWII, the camp was used by the Army and Air Force. The facility has been demolished. The former location of this facility is unknown to the Living New Deal.
  • University of Wyoming Recreation Camp (demolished): Main Hall - Centennial WY
    The Works Progress Administration built the university Main Hall east wing in Centennial, Albany County. The camp had been founded near Mullen Creek in 1935 by a CCC camp (possibly F-36). The University of Wyoming later used the facility as a recreation camp. During WWII, the camp was used by the Army and Air Force. The facility has been demolished. The former location and condition of this facility is unknown to the Living New Deal.
  • University of Wyoming: Arts and Sciences Auditorium - Laramie WY
    The Arts and Sciences Auditorium, originally known as the Liberal Arts Building, on the University of Wyoming campus in Laramie was constructed as a federal Public Works Administration (P.W.A.) project during the Great Depression. The P.W.A. provided a $213,700 loan and $100,600 grand toward the project, whose total cost was $366,755. Construction occurred between Feb. 1935 and Jun. 1936. PWA Docket No. WY 5152
  • University of Wyoming: Knight Hall (Women's Dormitory) - Laramie WY
    The Works Progress Administration conducted work on women's dormitories at the University of Wyoming in Laramie. The structure was designed in Collegiate Gothic style by Wilbur Hitchcock. Today the building serves as Knight Hall and houses Student Services.
  • University of Wyoming: Wyoming Union - Laramie WY
    The Wyoming Union building on the University of Wyoming campus in Laramie was constructed as a federal Public Works Administration (P.W.A.) project during the Great Depression. The P.W.A. provided a $128,250 grant toward the project, whose total cost was $295,955. Construction occurred between Nov. 1937 and Feb. 1939. PWA Docket No. WY 1059-DS
  • Urban Assembly School for the Performing Arts - New York NY
    The Urban Assembly School for the Performing Arts, located on West 129th Street in Manhattan, was originally built as the Manhattanville Junior High School during the 1930s. Construction benefited from federal Public Works Administration (PWA) funds as part of PWA Docket No. NY 8000. PWA documents state that the four-story school measures 300 ft. by 200 ft. and is 60 feet tall. Ground was broken May 10, 1935; work was completed September 1, 1937; and the school was occupied that month. The 56-room school featured the following classrooms: art weaving; woodworking; novelty; sheet metal shops; office practice; science; drawing; sewing; cooking; geography;...
  • Utah State Hospital Improvements - Provo UT
    The Works Progress Administration (WPA) made extensive improvements to the Utah State Hospital for the mentally handicapped in 1936-37.  WPA workers constructed a Recreation Center (now the Castle Amphitheater) and a Superintendent's Residence (now the Hospital Museum), as well as remodeling the Central Administration Building, upgrading the heating plant, and doing maintenance work on the 320-acre grounds of the hospital.    The former Central Administration Building was a large Victorian structure and apparently the WPA renovation work included removal of gothic spires from the old building. Unfortunately, that historic building has been demolished and replaced by a modern administration building of...
  • Utah State Hospital Museum - Provo UT
    The Museum at the historic Utah State Hospital for the mentally handicapped was formerly the Superintendent's Residence, which was constructed by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) in 1936-37 as part of a general improvements to the state hospital complex.  That work included renovations to the Central Administration Building and a Recreational Center (now the Castle Amphitheater).
  • Utah State University Eastern: Administration Building (demolished) - Price UT
    The PWA built the three original buildings of Carbon Junior College, now Utah State University Eastern, from 1937-38. In 2015, the last of these original buildings was demolished. From "A Look Back at the Old SAC": "Carbon College, created as a four-year junior college, would house four grades: junior and senior years of high school and freshman and sophomore years of college. This arrangement constituted a new educational concept drafted for junior colleges in the United States. The 27-room, main classroom building included academic studies, agricultural, business and cosmetology. 'Cosmetology, the latter course to be somewhat of an innovation in the Utah...
  • Utah State University: Family Life Building - Logan UT
    The Public Works Administration (PWA) funded the construction of the Home Economics building at the Utah State University. The structure was built in 1935-36 and designed by Leslie Hodgson & Myrl McClenahan.  It is a two story, yellow brick, Moderne structure with bas-relief columns between every set of windows, white decorative elements capping the columns, and a slightly projecting entrance with somewhat gothic windows over the doors. According to a USU Historical Buildings guide, “On October 18, 1933 the federal Public Works Administrator announced allotments in excess of ten million dollars for non-federal projects. As part of the allotment given to the...
  • Utah State University: Lund Hall (demolished) - Logan UT
    Lund Hall on the Utah State University campus in Logan, Utah, was constructed in 1936-37 with funding from the Public Works Administration (PWA). Architect of this Women's Residence Hall was the Salt Lake City-based firm of Young & Hansen and the general contractor was Frank Campion. It was "...one of over 230 public works buildings constructed in Utah under various New Deal programs during the Depression years of the 1930s and '40s. The construction of public works buildings, of which only 130 are extant and well preserved, not only offered temporary work relief, but also provided long-term benefits in the form...
  • Utah State University: Old Main Hill Amphitheater - Logan UT
    The historic stone amphitheater on Old Main Hill at Utah State University in Logan, Utah was constructed in 1934 with funding from the Public Works Administration (PWA) and the USU Classes of 1925 and 1926. The amphitheater is still in use, but one can see that the original wooden seats have long since been removed, leaving traces of their metal supports.  
  • Uxbridge High School (Former) - Uxbridge MA
    A large Art Deco design constructed with federal Public Works Administration (PWA) funds in 1936. It was designed by S. Wesley Haynes & Associates of Fitchburg. In 2012 it became McCloskey Middle School when a new high school opened.
  • VA Hospital - White River Junction VT
    The original facilities at the VA Medical Center in White River Junction, Vermont were constructed ca. 1938 as part of the New Deal, with federal / Public Works Administration (PWA) funds. "Looking back to 1938, the WRJ VAMC began its service to Veterans in a comparatively small three story T-shaped building."
  • VA Hospital (former) Landscaping - Salt Lake City UT
    The Works Progress Administration (WPA) conducted landscaping work at the now-former VA Hospital, located northeast of the Utah State Capitol in Salt Lake City. The property, now a luxury condo complex, is now privately owned. Its location has been described as 12th Avenue and E Street; the former VA Hospital building is closest to Capitol Park Ave.
  • VA Illiana Facility Improvements - Danville IL
    Danville, Illinois's Veterans' Administration Facility was improved as part of Federal Project F-55. The federal Civil Works Administration (CWA) conducted interior and exterior painting and decoration work at buildings on the grounds. The project "carried authorization of $3,100 for materials and a quota of 24 workers."
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