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  • CCC Camp F-9 (Mt Nebo) - Mt Nebo UT
    In 1933, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) set up one of the first camps in Utah in Salt Creek Canyon a few miles east of Nephi, near what is now the intersection of highway 132  and FR015 (the Mount Nebo Scenic Byway).  The camp number was F-9, meaning it worked under the US Forest Service. Working out of Camp F-9, various CCC companies carried out extensive improvements around the southern flank of Mt. Nebo.. The first, in 1933, was building the central section of Mt. Nebo Loop Road (that was company 958, which subsequently operated out of Camps F-30 and F-40...
  • CCC Camp Fall Creek (former) - Willamette National Forest OR
    Organized in 1933 and operating through at least 1937, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Fall Creek Camp was the home to Company #965, accommodating approximately 200 enrollees. The site of the camp was covered by a reservoir in 1964-1966. The nearby Clark Creek Organization Camp, ten miles to the east on Fall Creek, is one of the largest projects completed by workers from Fall Creek Camp. A plaque at Clark Creek Organization Camp honors the work of the Fall Creek Camp CCC enrollees, saying: "While on the Willamette National Forest, (they) built the Fall Creek Road and bridges, the Fall Creek trail,...
  • CCC Camp Fechner - Danbury CT
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (C.C.C.)'s Camp Fechner, which housed Company #2102 at Wooster Mountain State Park in Danbury, Connecticut, conducted the following improvement and development work: "removal and burning of over 80,000 elm trees to control Dutch Elm Disease; construction of roads; forest fire suppression and prevention; forestry work; control the Pine Shoot Moth; assistance in the lower Connecticut River Valley after the Flood of 1936." The camp operated from Sept. 12, 1935 to May 24, 1937.
  • CCC Camp Heppner (former) - Heppner OR
    In 1935, Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers completed Camp Heppner on a site just east of the Morrow County Fairgrounds’ race course and north of the Heppner Highway. From its founding to closure in November 1941, several CCC companies resided there while assisting local ranchers by implementing soil conservation demonstration projects.  No evidence of the camp remains. The Heppner Gazette-Times, the town’s weekly newspaper, reported in early July 1935 that local carpenters and “28 CCC helpers” were running ahead of schedule in completion of the camp. The report also stated that the work had entirely eliminated unemployment in the town given the...
  • CCC Camp Lovelock (former) - Lovelock NV
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) established a camp near Lovelock NV during the 1930s, officially BR-36, popularly called Camp Lovelock or sometimes Camp Pershing. It was located near the main road north of town (along what is now Interstate 80). No trace of it remains today. CCC enrollees helped with improvements to the Humboldt River Project of the Bureau of Reclamation and the irrigation system of the Lovelock Valley (then private, but today part of the Pershing County Water Conservation District). They worked on ancillary construction jobs during the final stage of construction of the Rye Patch Dam and Reservoir and...
  • CCC Camp Mill Creek (former) - Prineville OR
    Located on the western edge of the Ochocho National Forest, approximately twenty miles from Prineville, Oregon, Camp Mill Creek served as a major Civilian Conservation Corps worksite from 1933 to 1942. The entrance to the camp's location is marked in honor of the hundreds of young men who worked on projects in this national forest. As described on the roadside plaque: "The young men of Camp Mill Creek did reforestation work, fought forest fires and constructed and maintained roads, trails, telephone lines and campgrounds." CCC workers, under the supervision of the US Forest Service, are credited with constructing several buildings located...
  • CCC Camp NA-1 (National Arboretum) - Washington DC
    Camp NA-1 was located in the National Arboretum, Washington, DC, and was home to Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Company 1360, an all African-American unit. Many of the enrollees in Company 1360 were young men from the city itself. Company 1360 formed on June 7, 1933 at Fort George Meade, Maryland and, after initial work assignments in Chester, Virginia (Camp P-61) and Williamsburg, Virginia (Camp SP-9), the men settled into Camp NA-1 in November 1934. From then until 1941 these young African American men made the earliest significant developments to the National Arboretum – a project of the Bureau of Plant Industry...
  • CCC Camp Navy-1 (Former) – Yorktown VA
    Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Camp Navy-1 was created at Yorktown, Virginia, on November 1, 1935, for the purposes of improving the Naval Mine Depot (a 20-square mile area that is now called “Naval Weapons Station Yorktown”). The camp housed Company 2305, one of several African American CCC units in the area. Prior to its involvement at the Naval Mine Depot, and prior to its re-designation as “Navy-1,” the same camp was devoted to soil erosion control along the York River and along Colonial Parkway. This work was part of a larger CCC project (involving at least 4 other African American companies)...
  • CCC Camp Nehalem (former) - Wheeler OR
    Located nine miles northeast of Wheeler in Tillamook County, Camp Nehalem was the home to Company #2908 Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) enrollees from 1935 to approximately 1941. Company #2908 was known as the "Oregon Company," being made up entirely of Oregon enrollees. Its project designation, P-221, indicates that the company worked primarily on private forest land. When the company was formed in 1933, CCC Camp Boyington near Astoria housed the 200 enrollees of Company #2908. From 1933 - 1936, severe forest fires plagued the area and many of the CCC companies provided forest fighting services. The company was moved from its...
  • CCC Camp NHP-1 (former) – Yorktown VA
    Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Camp NHP-1 was created at Yorktown, Virginia, for the purpose of developing the Colonial National Historical Park (Jamestown Settlement, Yorktown Battlefield, Colonial Parkway). Camp NHP-1 housed CCC Company 352, which had been formed at Fort Monroe, Virginia, on April 27, 1933. Company 352, along with four other African American CCC companies, developed Colonial National Historical Park. This work would continue until at least the end of 1941 – virtually the entire life of the CCC program. The CCC enrollees worked under the direction of the National Park Service (NPS), which had just taken over the job of caring for military and...
  • CCC Camp NHP-4 (former) – Yorktown VA
    Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Camp NHP-4 was created at Yorktown, Virginia, for the purpose of developing the Colonial National Historical Park (Jamestown Settlement, Yorktown Battlefield, Colonial Parkway). Camp NHP-4 housed CCC Company 1351, a World War I veterans company that had been formed at Langley Field, Virginia, on May 26, 1933. Company 1351, along with four other African American CCC companies, developed Colonial National Historical Park. This work would continue until at least the end of 1941 – essentially, the entire life of the CCC program. The CCC enrollees worked under the direction of the National Park Service (NPS), which had just taken over...
  • CCC Camp NHP-5 (Former) – Williamsburg VA
    Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Camp NHP-5 was created at Williamsburg, Virginia, for the purpose of developing the Lake Matoaka area, part of the College of William & Mary campus. Beginning in 1934, Camp NHP-5 housed CCC Company 2303, an African American unit. 2303’s work at Matoaka State Park included “trails and bridges, a boat house, picnic shelters, and an amphitheatre seating 500 persons” (Dist. 4, Third Corps Area history, 1937). Today, it seems this area is no longer called “Matoaka State Park,” but is simply viewed as part of the overall campus and holdings of the college.    Company 2303 also helped four...
  • CCC Camp NM-3/SP-23 - Muir Woods National Monument CA
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) established a camp on Mount Tamalpais in October 1933 and CCC enrollees did extensive work around Mount Tamalpais in Marin County CA, north of the Golden Gate.  They carried out improvements in Muir Woods National Monument on the south flank of the mountain, Mt. Tamalpais State Park which encircles the summit and Marin Water District on the north side of the mountain.  The National Park Service says this about the camp: "October 1933: Often called the "busiest month" in the history of Muir Woods, this month saw the arrival of the Civilian Conservation Corps, or the CCC,...
  • CCC Camp Rangeley Lake Co. 144 P-55 - Sandy River ME
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) built CCC Camp Rangeley Lake Co. 144 P-55 in Sandy River, Maine. Excerpt  from Official annual, 1937, Civilian Conservation Corps: "The 144th Company, CCC, is located about three miles south of Rangeley, Maine on Route No. 4. This camp was established on June 5th, 1933. The location of this camp is but a few rods from the edge of the famous Rangleley Lake. The elevation at the camp site is 1650 feet above sea level. The camp is located in a small open valley nestling at the foot of the foothills of the Blue Mountain range. The majority of...
  • CCC Camp Roberts - Thomaston CT
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC)’s Camp Roberts, which housed Company #175, was stationed at Black Rock State Park in Thomaston, Connecticut. The camp was established May 30, 1933 and was discontinued Sept. 28, 1937. The camp's "main projects were: building miles of truck trails, survey and boundary work, gypsy moth removal, tree planting."
  • CCC Camp S-82, Company 1139 - Townsend MA
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) built the CCC Camp S-82, Company 1139, in Townsend, MA, starting on August 1st, 1935. Camp S-82 was located near an old granite quarry off Old Turnpike Road and the Boston and Maine Railroad tracks, currently still in place. According to Shary Page Berg (1999), "Much of the area that became Townsend State Forest was burned in a 1927 forest fire and subsequently logged, leaving the land in poor condition when acquired by the state in 1934. Camp S-82 (Company 1139) was established in fall 1935 and closed in 1940. Projects at Townsend included the construction of...
  • CCC Camp S-88 - Townsend MA
    The Civilian Conservation Corps, established Camp S-88 on the east side of the Townsend State Forest, in Townsend, MA in 1935. The CCC worked on reclaiming fire-damaged areas. The camp no longer exists, though there are reports that cellars associated with the camp have been found on the site.
  • CCC Camp Saddle Mountain (former) - Seaside OR
    Members of Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) #1258 arrived at CCC Camp Saddle Mountain near Seaside and Cannon Beach OR in the summer of 1935. The majority of the Company's enrollees were from New York. Although the CCC workers occupied tents upon their arrival, they began construction of bunkhouses, recreational halls, officers' quarters and other camp buildings. With the camp's completion, the encampment grew to its full strength of 200 men. Located near what was then the Nehalem Highway (now US Hwy 26), the camp's site was rented by the state to the federal government. Improvement of that land for Oregon State Park...
  • CCC Camp SCS-10 Camp Cabell - Culloden WV
    The Civilian Conservation Corps builtCamp Cabell in the vicinity of Culloden between 1939 and 1941. The 1940 Enumeration District Map shows the camp location.
  • CCC Camp Skinner Butte (former) - Eugene OR
    Soon after the establishment of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in March 1933, CCC Camp Skinner Butte was established in Eugene, Oregon to serve as the headquarters of CCC camps in what was then the Eugene District. Within a year, regional administrators reconfigured the districts and closed Camp Skinner Butte. During its year of operation, Camp Skinner (as it was dubbed) served as the headquarters for the Works Progress Administration (WPA) and the National Youth Administration (NYA) as well. The Camp occupied the former car camping and picnic area in Eugene's Skinner Butte Park. Although the City of Eugene established a...
  • CCC Camp SP-10 (former) - Berkeley CA
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) established Camp SP-10 in Strawberry Canyon in the hills behind the main campus of the University of California, Berkeley.   Camp SP-10 was home to CCC Company 751 from October 5, 1933 to May 31, 1934. H.C. Merrick was the Commanding Officer. This was an integrated CCC camp, based on photographs of the enrollees. It is believed that the camp was at current location of the parking lot across from the university botanical garden.
  • CCC Camp SP3 - Fairburn SD
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) maintained a camp on French Creek east of Custer State Park in South Dakota from 1934 to 1941.  It was officially camp SP-3 (meaning State Park #3).  The recruits worked on projects in region under the supervision of Custer State Park rangers and the National Park Service (NPS). The CCC enrollees built many miles of road, telephone lines and boundary fences. To this they added 20 bridges.  They constructed a fire lookout on Mt. Coolidge, along with a ranger's residence there, and fought fires and bark beetle infestations. They developed the Blue Bell Lodge and cabins...
  • CCC Camp Squaw Butte (former) - Burns OR
    In the  winter of 1935, members of Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) #1629 began construction of camp administrative and barracks buildings near Squaw Butte to facilitate CCC work related to the 16,000 acre Squaw Butte Federal Experimental Range Station. Today some of those building survive to support work at the North Great Basin Experimental Range Station and continued research on the ecology and  management of rangelands. CCC Company #2504 arrived in October 1936 to further the work associated with the Squaw Butte Experiment Station and its efforts to improve grazing conditions in this very dry, sagebrush area of Harney County, Oregon. The...
  • CCC Camp Toumey - Goshen / Cornwall CT
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (C.C.C.)'s Camp Toumey was stationed at Mohawk State Forest from June 25, 1933 to July 26, 1941. "Named for James W. Toumey, Dean of the Yale School of Forestry, CCC men from this camp lived among the rugged hills and panoramic vistas of northwestern Connecticut. This camp was originally designed as a camp exclusively for veterans of World Was I and, as such, the enrollees were older. But as the veterans' need for employment waned, younger enrollees were gradually added to the camp." Among other projects linked to from this page, accomplishments included: "fighting forest fires; making improvements...
  • CCC Camp V1 near Lindbergh Bay - St. Thomas VI
    The CCC built camp facilities near Lindbergh Bay in St. Thomas. The Annual Report of the Governor of the Virgin Islands for 1938 describes the CCC's effort to expand enrollment and camp facilities across the islands: "The senior camp in St. Thomas has maintained an enrollment of approximately 75 persons, and the junior camps in St. Thomas and St. Croix have maintained their authorized enrollment of 100 men each. In the next fiscal year it is proposed to increase the enrollment of the St. Croix camp from 100 to 150 men" In 1939, the Lindbergh Bay camp moved to make way for a Marine Corps...
  • CCC Camp V2 Estate Grand Princess - Christiansted, St. Croix VI
    The CCC built camp facilities at Estate Grand Princess (La Grande Princesse) near Christiansted. The Annual Report of the Governor of the Virgin Islands for 1938 describes the CCC's establishment and planned expansion of the camp in St. Croix, "the junior camps in St. Thomas and St. Croix have maintained their authorized enrollment of 100 men each. In the next fiscal year it is proposed to increase the enrollment of the St. Croix camp from 100 to 150 men."
  • CCC Camp Vale (former) - Vale OR
    Built in the summer of 1935 and operated through October 1940, Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Camp Vale served as the base for CCC enrollees working on the Vale Project's irrigation system. The Bureau of Reclamation's Vale Project involved construction of the Agency Valley Dam, located along the Malheur River and Willow Creek in east-central Oregon. At the dam's completion, the work of the enrollees at Camp BR-45/Camp Vale began. They finished the necessary means of furnishing irrigation water to area ranchers by building the lateral irrigation system to farm tracts in the area. These "soil soldiers," as the Bureau of Reclamation...
  • CCC Camp Warrenton (former) - Warrenton OR
    CCC Camp Warrenton housed companies of Civilian Conservation Company (CCC) enrollees with a special mission. Although called upon occasionally to fight fires, their primary charge was stabilizing beaches along Clatsop County's coastline. As reported by the Daily Astorian, the Columbia River south jetty had "played havoc on the beaches as far south as Gearhart" since its completion in 1913. Planting Holland Dune Grass along with wooden fences was, at the time, an experiment to halt beach erosion. One report suggests the commitment to this soil conservation project began with the beginning of the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1933. By June 1936,...
  • CCC Camp Wawona (former) - Yosemite National Park CA
    Camp Wawona, at the south end of Yosemite National Park, was one of two hubs for the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in the park during the New Deal era, 1933-42 (the other hub was at Camp Cascades in Yosemite Valley).  The Wawona area had only been added to the park in 1932 and there was much work to be done to improve that part of the park. The first two camps at Wawona, YNP #1 and 2, were established in May 1933 and were the first CCC camps in the West. These early camps were located at the far end of...
  • CCC Camp White - Barkhamsted CT
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (C.C.C.)'s Camp White, which housed Company #106 at American Legion State Forest in Barkhamsted, Connecticut, operated from Dec. 28, 1933 to Jan. 1, 1942. C.C.C. Museum: This camp was named for Alan C. White, who was a leader in the campaign to purchase the land that would become Peoples State Forest. The original site of Camp White is now used as a youth group camping area and the building site and camp roads are still visible. The camp had a tree nursery and built the Stone Museum as a natural interpretive center. The museum, nursery building, and camp office are...
  • CCC Camp Wilderness - Fredericksburg VA
    MP4 Camp Wilderness was one of 4 CCC camps in the Fredericksburg area set up to develop locations of major Civil War battles, Camp Bloody Angle (MP-1) was at the battle of Spotsylvania Court House, Camp Wilderness (MP-4) was at the Battle of the Wilderness, and Camp Chancellorsville (MP-3) was at the Battle of Chancellorsville. One camp was on private property centered between the other three. It was Camp Malcomb McArthur (P-69) along Catharpin Road. The Wilderness camp was established Oct 14, 1933 and was abandoned Apr 3, 1941. First, it was home to the boys of Company 282. On...
  • CCC Camp Wolcott - Torrington CT
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC)'s Company #176, Camp Wolcott, was based at Paugnut State Forest in Torrington, Connecticut. It operated from 1933 to 1937. Work accomplished included construction of 8 miles of truck trails and many miles of cross-country ski trails.
  • CCC Camp Zigzag (former), Mount Hood National Forest - Zigzag OR
    Camp Zigzag, near Zigzag OR in Clackamas County, was the chief Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) camp in the Mount Hood National Forest, operating from 1933 to 1942 when the CCC was terminated.  Several of the CCC buildings are still in place and in use at the site, which is now one of four US Forest Service district Ranger Stations in the Mt. Hood NF. Some of the buildings at Camp Zigzag predate the CCC, but most were built by CCC workers and are still standing and in use: the Ranger's Office, Carpenter Shop, Bunkhouse Residence, Ranger's Residence, Gas House, Fire Warehouse,...
  • CCC Camp, Tongass - Annette Island AK
    Starting with 1933, the CCC built multiple camps in the Tongass Forest, among which was a camp on Annette Island. Initially, the Alaska program consisted of builiding small camps in the Tongass and Chugach forests, with an enrollment of 325 men. The program expanded in 1937 outside of the National forest boundaries. The Annette Island camp was part of this expansion: "As a result of the additional enrollment and work load, the Forest Service began a cooperative program with the National Park Service and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The expanded program made special efforts to enroll Eskimos and other native Alaskans....
  • CCC Camp: Blue Hills Reservation - Milton MA
    From 1933-1937 a Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) camp operated within the Blue Hills Reservation, south of Boston. Over that time the CCC made numerous improvements to the Reservation, including two lookout towers, ski trails, a toboggan run, and any number of road and trail enhancements. Bare remnants of the CCC camp remain today, but are noted with historical markers. Description of C.C.C. activities in the Blue Hills Reservation, per the Metropolitan District Commission 1938 annual report: "The camp work crews assigned to the creosoting of gypsy moth egg clusters continued the work started in the fall of 1936 until the spring hatching...
  • CCC Camps - Coronado National Forest AZ
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was very active in the Coronado National Forest during the 1930s. Coronado National Forest is discontinuous across southeastern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico because the forested areas occur only on isolated mountain ranges called "Sky Islands" – a type of landscape similar to the Basin and Range in Nevada. Segments of the national forest are found in five counties: Cochise, Graham, Santa Cruz, Pima, and Pinal Counties in Arizona, and Hidalgo County in New Mexico. There were five CCC camps in  Coronado National Forest south-central Arizona: F-42 Tanque Verde in the Rincon Mountains; SP-11, Box Canyon...
  • CCC Camps - Grand Canyon National Park AZ
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was extremely active in Grand Canyon National Park from 1933 to 1942.  There were six CCC camps on the North Rim, South Rim and in the canyon itself and seven companies active over the decade: #818, 819, 847, 2543, 2833, 3318 and 4814.   Grand Canyon National Park received more development funds and labor from the Civilian Conservation Corps than any other location in Arizona. CCC enrollees built many of the recreation facilities still in use today, such as paths, trails, roads, shelters, and campgrounds, along with basic infrastructure, such as telephone lines, electric lines, water pipes and sewer...
  • CCC Camps - Humboldt Redwoods State Park CA
    Humboldt Redwoods State Park was established in 1921 with purchases of some of the last remaining Old Growth stands of Coast Redwoods by the Save the Redwoods League. It has since been expanded several times and now includes over 51,000 acres, of which 17,000 are old growth redwood stands.   California did not establish a state parks system until 1928, and little improvement work had been done at Humboldt Redwoods before the New Deal.  When the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) arrived at Dyerville camp in 1933, the young men got to work right away developing the state park.  There were three CCC...
  • CCC Camps - St. Thomas VI
    On January 29, 1935, the Emergency Conservation Work was inaugurated on the Virgin Islands and the CCC was established along with two camps. The CCC built camp facilities across the islands, on St. Thomas, St. Croix, and St. John. The Annual Report of the Governor of the Virgin Islands, published betweeen 1935 and 1942 describes the CCC’s effort to establish and expand the camps: “Substantial and well-equipped camp buildings have been constructed, the necessity to provide against hurricanes making it desirable to provide sturdy housing units. The enrollees (limited to the ages between 18 and 25 years) are benefiting by improved food and...
  • CCC Camps (former) - Rocky Mountain National Park CO
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was active in Rocky Mountain National Park during the whole of its lifetime, 1933 to 1942.  There were at least six camps in the park, three of which were permanent and three seasonal. The camps were labeled NP-1, 3, 4, 7, 11 and 12. The first camp was NP-1 at Little Horseshoe Park in the northeast part of the park.  The second camp was NP-3 located about 12 miles north of Grand Lake at Phantom Valley, a tent camp that only lasted 1933-34. Camp NP-4 built in 1934 in Hollowell Park was the first permanent camp with...
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