1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
  • Franklin D. Roosevelt Memorial - Washington DC
    The Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) Memorial in Washington DC was completed in 1997 at cost of $48 million dollars, funded largely by the federal government. It is located in West Potomac Park, along the tidal basin between the Lincoln and Thomas Jefferson memorials.  The memorial is managed by the National Park Service. The FDR Memorial is divided into four sections, with each section representing one of FDR’s four terms in the White House. The Cultural Landscape Foundation describes it: “The memorial’s rooms and water features, built primarily of red South Dakota granite, use stone to express the fracture and upheaval of the...
  • Frederick Douglass National Historic Site Restoration - Washington DC
    The Works Progress Administration’s (WPA) and the National Youth Administration (NYA) undertook crucial preservation work at the Frederick Douglass home ("Cedar Hill") along the Anacostia River in Southeast Washington DC, where the great abolitionist writer and former slave lived and worked from 1878 to his death in 1895. The restoration work was focused on Douglass' papers, library and artifacts, and on improvements to the extensive grounds of the estate. An article published in the The Atlanta Constitution in 1939 reported that the WPA Historical Records Survey Project was “cleaning assembling, indexing and filing the valuable papers” of the late Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) at...
  • General Hancock Sculpture - New York NY
    "This monumental bronze portrait bust, dedicated in 1893, depicts Civil War General Winfield Scott Hancock (1824–1886), and was created by American sculptor James Wilson Alexander MacDonald (1824–1908)." (www.nycgovparks.org) In the 1930s, the bust was restored with federal funding under Karl Gruppe, "chief sculptor of the Monument Restoration Project of the New York City Parks Department, from 1934 to 1937." The program was initially supported by federal funding from the Public Works of Art Project (Lowrey, 2008), and later by the WPA.
  • George C. Davis Site Archaeological Excavation - Alto TX
    For two years, the Works Progress Administration (WPA), under the leadership of University of Texas at Austin archaeologists, excavated an area known as the George C. Davis Site (41CE19). The site yielded artifacts from the Caddoan Mississippian culture that existed there from 800 A.D. to 1300 A.D. The archaeologists also found artifacts from the Spanish colonial era in Texas (1690-1821 A.D.) as the site was along the El Camino Real de los Tejas. The artifacts are held by the Texas Archaeological Research Laboratory at The University of Texas at Austin. The official WPA project number was 65-1-66-2594. The George C. Davis...
  • Ghost Town Restoration - Columbia CA
    The State Emergency Relief Administration (SERA) financed a $25,000 appropriation "which employed 65 research workers out of the Bancroft Library of U.C. Berekey and 56 additional workers put to work in the field to gather the necessary information to provide for the restoration of the old town of Columbia, in Tuolumne County." According to the Mariposa Gazette, efforts were being made in 1934 to have a local Mariposa County ghost town Hornitos being made into a state park in a similar way to what was occurring in Columbia California. Like most Mother Lode towns of the Gold Rush era gold was discovered...
  • Giuseppe Verdi Monument Restoration - New York NY
    The Works Progress Administration (WPA) worked to restore the Giuseppe Verdi Monument during the mid-1930s.
  • Government House Reconstruction - Christiansted, St. Croix VI
    Government House, in Christiansted, St. Croix, was reconstructed and fireproofed with the assistance of federal Public Works Administration (P.W.A.) funds. The Annual Report of the Governor of the Virgin Islands for 1941 mentions that the rehabilitation of the Government House in Christiansted provided "modern, comfortable living and office accommodations. (…) This work has been done under the supervision of the Public Buildings Administration, Federal Works Agency.”
  • Government House Repairs - Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas VI
    "Outstanding achievements were the completion of the rehabilitation of the Government House and Administration Building in Charlotte Amalie and the Government House in Christiansted, providing modern, comfortable living and office accommodations. (...) This work has been done under the supervision of the Public Buildings Administration, Federal Works Agency."
  • Governor Wentworth Historic Site Improvements - Wolfeboro NH
    Governor Wentworth Historic Site is a 96-acre (0.39 km2) protected area in Wolfeboro, New Hampshire. The undeveloped property features a plaque and the stone remains of an extensive northern plantation built just before the outbreak of the American Revolution by New Hampshire's second Royal Governor, John Wentworth. The mansion burned to the ground in 1820. The CCC 117th COMPANY S-53 out of Tamworth NH were involved in the remodeling of a cottage and garage.
  • Governor’s Totem Pole - Juneau AK
    Located in front of the Governor’s Mansion in Juneau, the Governor’s Totem Pole was commissioned by the Civilian Conservation Corps. It was carved between 1939-1940. Charlie Tagook, a Tlingit carver from Klukwan, began the work, and William N. Brown, a Tlingit and head carver from Saxman, finished it. The totem stands at 31’-6” tall, and is carved on a yellow cedar log. The seven figures represented on it illustrate Tlingit legends. “Figure one on top is Raven and in descending order are Grandfather Raven, Man, Giant Cannibal, Mosquito, The World, and Old Woman Underneath,” reports Klas Stolpe in the Juneau...
  • Gracie Mansion Restoration - New York NY
    Gracie Mansion has been the official residence of New York City's mayor since 1942, Mayor Fiorello H. La Guardia and his family moved in.  It is located on East 88th Street in Carl Schurz park.  The federal style house was built in the 18th century for wealthy merchant Jacob Watson.  In 1798 ship merchant Archibald Gracie traded his Lower East Side townhouse for the Watson mansion in what was then known as Yorkville. The city purchase the Gracie estate in 1886 to expand Carl Schurz park.   For years it served various functions as part of Schurz park, housing public restrooms, an ice cream stand, and classrooms. From 1924 until 1936, it...
  • Grand Army Plaza: General Sherman Sculpture Restoration - New York NY
    "This majestic, gilded-bronze equestrian group statue depicts one of the United States’ best-known generals, William Tecumseh Sherman (1820 – 1891). Dedicated in 1903, it was master sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens’s (1848 – 1907) last major work, and serves as the centerpiece of Manhattan’s Grand Army Plaza." In the 1930s, the sculpture was restored with federal funding under Karl Gruppe, "chief sculptor of the Monument Restoration Project of the New York City Parks Department, from 1934 to 1937." The program was initially supported by federal funding from the Public Works of Art Project (Lowrey, 2008), and later by the WPA. The statue's gold leaf...
  • Grand Army Plaza: Pomona Statue Restoration - New York NY
    The Works Progress Administration (WPA) worked to restore the Pomona statue (also known as the "Lady of the Plaza") in Grand Army Plaza in Manhattan, during the mid-1930s. The statue tops the Pulitzer Fountain in the plaza's southern half.
  • Grand Army Plaza: Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Arch Restoration - Brooklyn NY
    This dramatic arch in Brooklyn's Grand Army Plaza was created by architect John Hemingway Duncan in 1889-1892. The statuary on the arch was added over the next several years, by several different artists including William Rudolf O'Donovan (men), Thomas Eakins (horses) and Frederick MacMonnies (Army and Navy sculptures and the allegorical crowning sculpture). In the 1930s, the sculpture was restored with federal funding under Karl Gruppe, "chief sculptor of the Monument Restoration Project of the New York City Parks Department, from 1934 to 1937." The program was initially supported by federal funding from the Public Works of Art Project (Lowrey, 2008),...
  • Grant Square: Ulysses S. Grant Sculpture Restoration - Brooklyn NY
    "This large bronze equestrian statue by William Ordway Partridge (1861-1930) depicts Civil War General and 18th United States President Ulysses Simpson Grant (1822-1885). Though Grant’s reputation was tarnished after serving as President amidst one of the most corrupt administrations in the nation’s history, he is revered for his decisive action in bringing about the end of the Civil War... The sculpture of Grant was commissioned by the Union Club of Brooklyn and unveiled on April 27, 1896, the 74th anniversary of his birth. Partridge depicts a determined Grant in his military outfit, including his signature wide-brimmed hat. The work is one...
  • Great Smoky Mountains National Park Development - Gatlinburg TN
    Great Smoky Mountains National Park occupies large areas of western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee. The park’s creation was a decades-long process, including advocacy in the late 19th century; legislation signed by President Calvin Coolidge in 1926; and donations and land acquisitions from small donors, the governments of North Carolina and Tennessee, and charitable organizations, such as the Laura Spelman Rockefeller Memorial Fund. Once the park’s existence was firmly established, funding from the Public Works Administration (PWA) and labor from the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) made it both accessible and accommodating to the public. President Franklin Roosevelt dedicated the park on...
  • Grover Cleveland Birthplace Restoration - Caldwell NJ
    The building was originally constructed in 1832 and many of the rooms portray it as it looked in 1837, the year of Grover Cleveland's birth. In 1936, laborers for the Works Progress Administration (WPA) restored the building to its original appearance.
  • Hale Pa‘ahao Prison Improvements - Lahaina HI
    Hale Pa‘ahao (stuck-in-irons house) was Lahaina’s “new” prison, built in the 1850s during  the whaling era. The prison has been restored three times, in the 1930s, 1950s and 1970s. The Lahaina Restoration Foundation reports that:  "During the 1930s, County of Maui sponsored reconstruction of the cells and stockade  by the Works Progress Administration (WPA)."  There is a stone marker acknowledging the WPA's work, as well. Another metal marker says that the gatehouse was restored in 1959.  Then, as the Lahaina Restoration Foundation report continues: "In 1967, Lahaina Restoration Foundation presented to Maui Historical Commission a plan for restoring the old prison. It detailed...
  • Hanby House - Westerville OH
    Once the home of Bishop William Hanby, a conductor on the Underground Railroad, and his son, Benjamin Hanby, a popular composer, in 1937 the Works Progress Administration (WPA) moved the Hanby House to its current location, to save it from demolition. Between 1941 and 1942, WPA laborers also performed structural renovation and historic restoration work at this site, now a museum.
  • Harmony Borax Works - Death Valley National Park CA
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was present in Death Valley National Monument  from 1933 to 1942.  The main CCC camp was at Cow Creek, just north of the park headquarters and visitors' center at Furnace Creek.   Among the many projects undertaken in the park by the CCC shoring up the remains of the Harmony Borax Works and nearby worker housing (of which little remained).  The Harmony Works processed borax scraped off the playas and then taken by 20-mule teams to the railhead at Mojave CA.  The company was owned by San Francisco's William Coleman and closed at the time of...
  • Harry Hopkins House - Washington DC
    WPA Administrator, Secretary of Commerce, and aide to the president Harry Hopkins lived in this Georgetown house from about 1943 to 1946. A plaque on the building reads, “Harry Hopkins House, 3340 N Street, N.W., c. 1830, Foundation for Preservation of Historic Georgetown, Easement Acquired 2005.”
  • Henry Whitfield State Museum Restoration - Guilford CT
    The Federal Writers' Project wrote: "Whitfield House, on Whitfield St., is one of the earliest stone houses in America and probably the oldest house in Connecticut. ... In 1936, under a Works Progress Administration project, which was directed by J. Frederick Kelly, an authority on early Connecticut architecture, the house was restored as nearly as possible to its original appearance, even to the odd window which old prints show across the southwest corner. Now maintained by the State as a museum, the building houses a varied collection of antiques and curios."
  • Holden Rhodes House Restoration - Richmond VA
    The City of Richmond, Virginia utilized Civil Works Administration funds to restore the Holden Rhodes House, a ca. 1840 Greek Revival granite house. An inappropriate addition of a two-story wraparound porch was removed and new porches constructed. In addition, handrails were restored to the steps leading to the house.
  • Huckins Estate - Ossipee NH
    According to a 1937 CCC Yearbook, the Tamworth NH CCC Camp Co.117 was involved in "complete remodeling of house and barn" at the Huckins Estate. After inquiring with a few local historians, Lois Sweeny of the Ossipee Historical Society located the Estate. Her report back said that "Simon O. Huckins. A walking tour brochure that we are reviving says “This large colonial revival house was the home of Simon O. Huckins, who developed a large logging business, lumber yard and store in Center Ossipee early in the 20th century. Like his neighbors, Huckins was active in church, political and community...
  • Hydaburg Totem Park - Hydaburg AK
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) established the Hydaburg Totem Park in 1939 with the goal of to preserving the art of the Pacific Northwest Coast Haida people and encouraging tourism to the area. The CCC employed native carves and laborers, thus fostering a partnership between the Federal Government, local government, and Alaskan natives. A brief history of the totem park by the National Park Service describes the role of the CCC in the development of Hydaburg and the park: "In the 1930s, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), supervised by U.S. Forest Service personnel, created Hydaburg Park, and several other similar parks in Southeast...
  • Hydaburg Totem Poles - Hydaburg AK
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) engaged native communities in Hydaburg in collaborative projects seekeing the preservation and restoration of native totem carvings: "In the 1930s, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), supervised by U.S. Forest Service personnel, created Hydaburg Park, and several other similar parks in Southeast Alaska. CCC workers brought poles to these parks from other locations. The government then hired local Haida workers to restore these totems. When restoration was not possible, replicas were carved. Twenty-one poles were brought to Hydaburg, five of which were able to be restored. The remaining 16 were replicated between 1939 and 1942."
  • Independence Hall Restoration - Philadelphia PA
    "Sites of WPA projects to preserve historic shrines include ... Independence Hall."
  • Indian King Tavern Restoration - Haddonfield NJ
    The federal Works Progress Administration (WPA) restored Haddonfield, New Jersey's historic Indian King Tavern ca. 1936.
  • Jackson Barracks Improvements - New Orleans LA
    Jackson Barracks was established in the early 19th century. It was transferred from the US Army to the state National Guard in the 1920s. "From 1936 to 1940, Louisiana adjutant general Raymond H. Fleming utilized the federal Works Progress Administration to provide renovation and new construction to the post. Included in the WPA project was a new headquarters building, later dedicated to the Louisiana commander... Fleming Hall served as the Guard's state headquarters until Hurricane Katrina. Just prior to the storm, it suffered a fire. It has since been restored and is in use as a conference building."   (https://neworleanshistorical.org) "In August 2005,...
  • Jackson House Restoration - New Orleans LA
    It appears that the historic Jackson House was restored by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) in the mid 1930s as part of a larger historic rehabilitation project in the Jackson Square area (source #1). The plaque on the building confuses matters, however, by claiming that the Jackson House was built in 1933 and restored in 1978 by the state of Louisiana.  The 1933 date hardly seems possible, given the age of the brick used in construction of the house (see photo of plaque for close-up of bricks). Furthermore, the building is shown on the 1876 Sanborn fire insurance map (image from...
  • Jackson Square Renovation - New Orleans LA
    During the New Deal, the Work Progress Administration (WPA) restored the historic buildings at the heart of the French Quarter in New Orleans, forming three sides of Jackson Square: the Upper and Lower Pontalba Buildings, the Cabildo and the Presbytère (see project pages on each one).  The work to restore the buildings was part of a larger effort by the WPA to document and restore historic sites in the French Quarter and to improve the appearance of the French Quarter for the purpose of improving tourism to the Crescent City. The project took place between 1935 and 1937, and it cost...
  • Kilbourn House Restoration - Milwaukee WI
    "An unusual WPA project involved the relocation of the Kilbourntown house to Estabrook Park. The Greek Revival home was built by pioneer carpenter and master builder Benjamin Church for his family in the early settlement of Kilbourntown near North Fourth and Court Streets. The building was rescued from demolition and moved in four pieces and restored by the WPA in 1938."
  • Kinishba Ruins National Historic Landmark - Fort Apache AZ
    "Kinishba Ruins was constructed by the Pueblo people and occupied as early as 800 until as late as 1400 A.D. Byron Cummings, director of the Arizona State Museum, and his students began excavation and reconstruction of Kinishba in 1931. In 1934 Cummings requested funds from the Civilian Conservation Corps-Indian Division to hire 25 local Apache laborers. Between 1934 and 1937 Kinishba also served as an archaeological field school where Cummings trained more than 70 students. In 1938 and 1939 Cummings and Apache enrollees continued to excavate and restore the ruins; they also constructed a small museum and residence. Cummings hoped...
  • Klawock Totem Park - Klawock AK
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) developed the Klawock Totem Park on the Prince of Wales Island, between 1938 and 1940. The CCC selected 21 poles out of the approximately 142 Tlingit and Haida totems that were originally located in the village of Tuxekan. With the accord of the former residents of Tuxekan, the CCC moved the totems to the Klawock Totem Park. The carvings found at Tuxekan were commemorative poles. Unlike other old Native villages, Tuxekan did not have any house post carvings. According to Viola Garfield and Linn Forrest (1961), what also distinguished the carvings at Tuxecan was that they...
  • Klawock Totem Park, Adventures of Raven Pole - Klawock AK
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) restored/recarved the Adventures of Raven Pole between 1938 and 1940. The restoration was part of a larger U.S. Forest Service program focused on the conservation of totems and Native cultural assets. The pole was originally found at the abandoned village of Tuxekan. With the accord of the former residents, the CCC and the U.S. Forrest Service relocated the pole to the Klawock Totem Park on the Prince of Wales Island. The Adventures of Raven Pole illustrates the series of legends about Raven the Transformer and the Creator. This was a central figure to the legends of the Tlingit....
  • Klawock Totem Park, Blackfish and Brown Bear Pole - Klawock AK
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) restored/recarved the Blackfish and Brown Bear Pole between 1938 and 1940. The restoration was part of a larger U.S. Forest Service program focused on the conservation of totems and Native cultural assets. The pole was originally found at the abandoned village of Tuxekan. With the accord of the former residents, the CCC and the U.S. Forrest Service relocated the pole to the Klawock Totem Park on the Prince of Wales Island. The figure of the Brown Bear suggests that this pole belonged to the members of the Wolf clan. The pole marks the resting place of a woman...
  • Klawock Totem Park, Bullhead and the Fight with the Land Otters Pole - Klawock AK
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) restored/recarved the Bullhead and the Fight with the Land Otters between 1938 and 1940. The restoration was part of a larger U.S. Forest Service program focused on the conservation of totems and Native cultural assets. The pole was originally found at the abandoned village of Tuxekan. With the accord of the former residents, the CCC and the U.S. Forrest Service relocated the pole to the Klawock Totem Park on the Prince of Wales Island. According to Viola Garfield and Linn Forrest (1961), the members of the Raven clan, who used to own the original pole, invited the...
  • Klawock Totem Park, Eagle and Blackfish Pole - Klawock AK
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) restored/recarved the Eagle and Blackfish Pole between 1938 and 1940. The restoration was part of a larger U.S. Forest Service program focused on the conservation of totems and Native cultural assets. The pole was originally found at the abandoned village of Tuxekan. With the accord of the former residents, the CCC and the U.S. Forrest Service relocated the pole to the Klawock Totem Park on the Prince of Wales Island. The Eagle and Blackfish Pole belongs to the Wolf phratry and marks the resting place of a member of the clan. The eagle figure identifies the group to...
  • Klawock Totem Park, Eagle and Wolf Pole - Klawock AK
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) restored/recarved the Eagle and Wolf Pole between 1938 and 1940. The restoration was part of a larger U.S. Forest Service program focused on the conservation of totems and Native cultural assets. The pole was originally found at the abandoned village of Tuxekan. With the accord of the former residents, the CCC and the U.S. Forrest Service relocated the pole to the Klawock Totem Park on the Prince of Wales Island. The Eagle and Wolf Pole belongs to the Wolf phratry and marks the resting place of a woman member of the clan. In their 1961 volume, The Wolf and...
  • Klawock Totem Park, Flicker Pole - Klawock AK
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) recarved the Flicker Pole between 1938 and 1940. The restoration was part of a larger U.S. Forest Service program focused on the conservation of totems and Native cultural assets. The pole was originally found at the abandoned village of Tuxekan. With the accord of the former residents, the CCC and the U.S. Forrest Service relocated the pole to the Klawock Totem Park on the Prince of Wales Island. In their 1961 volume, The Wolf and the Raven, anthropologist Viola Garfield and architect Linn Forrest note that the flicker bird, which tops this pole,  is also represented on the crest of...
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8