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  • Hermit Road and Overlooks - Grand Canyon Village AZ
    The federal Bureau of Public Roads (BPR) built the Hermit Road in Grand Canyon Village in 1934-35.  The National Park Service (NPS) website says this: "Hermit Road and most of its associated overlooks and parking areas are historic, designed and constructed in 1934-1935 by the Bureau of Public Roads and the National Park Service." Hermit Road and its overlooks have some of the best views of the Grand Canyon on the south rim.  It is commonly thought that the overlooks and wall were the work of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), but it was the BPR and NPS. The road was modernized...
  • Navajo Street Rock Wall and Improvements - Grand Canyon Village AZ
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) conducted extensive development work at Grand Canyon Village, 1933-37, including the rock walls and pillars at the bottom of Navajo Street. The National Park Service CCC Walking Tour adds these details: "The CCC constructed these rock pillars and walls in 1934 as a visual barrier between the public area and the residential area up Navajo Street. Historians believe that this is CCC work, although documentation is lacking. The recessed cement between the stones was a common CCC technique. Civilian Conservation Corps rock work has proven to be durable. Notice the extensive growth of lichens on the...
  • Bullocks Field (demolished) - Boulder City NV
    “To accommodate the dramatic increase in motorists, the highway between Las Vegas and Kingman, Arizona, was kept open year-round by 1936. Visitors came to southern Nevada by car, rail, and plane. The CCC helped extend and surface new runways at Bullock’s Field in Boulder City. For several years, the Grand Canyon Airlines and Trans World Airlines scheduled regular stops in Boulder City for its planes on the Newark, New Jersey, and Los Angeles, California, route.” –The Civilian Conservation Corps in Nevada The former Bullocks Fiel is largely no longer extant, with a hangar—located at 1401 Madrone St.— being the only major building...
  • Rim Trail: Log Benches - Grand Canyon Village AZ
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) conducted extensive development work at Grand Canyon Village,  1933-37. The National Park Service CCC Walking Tour notes that: "While the CCC crews were refurbishing the rock wall , they also constructed new log benches." Documentation is lacking as to whether the benches extant today were the original benches made by the CCC.
  • Rim Trail: Resurfacing - Grand Canyon Village AZ
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) conducted extensive development work at Grand Canyon Village, 1933 to 1937, including resurfacing the Rim Trail from roughly Hermit Road to Yavapai Point. The resurfacing extended far beyond the part of the trail in front of the hotels where the CCC built the well-known rock wall. The National Park Service's CCC Walking Tour states that, "During the summer of 1935, the CCC resurfaced the path along the rim ... and improved the trail to the east as far as Yavapai Observation Station."
  • Rim Trail: Rock Wall - Grand Canyon Village AZ
    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) conducted extensive development work at Grand Canyon Village, including reconstruction of an approximately 0.4-mile stretch of wall along the central portion of the Rim Trail, roughly between Bright Angel Lodge and El Tovar Hotel. The National Park Service's CCC Walking Tour says this: "Civilian Conservation Corps crews completely rebuilt the rock wall along the rim from Verkamps Curios to Lookout Studio in 1934–35, replacing a deteriorated, poorly constructed dry-laid wall and a section of wooden fence. Project planners standardized dimensions at 27 inches (69 cm) high and 18 inches (46 cm) wide." The most famous feature of...
  • Northern Arizona University: North Hall - Flagstaff AZ
    The Public Works Administration (PWA) gave the Arizona State Teachers College a grant of $105,000 and a loan of $313,000 to build housing on the campus – today's Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff.  These were North Hall, expansion of Taylor Hall and Cottage City. North Hall was constructed in 1935 as a women's dormitory at what was then the Arizona State Teachers' College.  It completed the "Women's Quadragle" at the north end of the college, at a time when most students at the college were women seeking careers as school teachers. The architecture of North Hall is brick Neoclassical, or Georgian, which...
  • Pennsylvania Railroad 4800 Locomotive (“Old Rivets”) - Strasburg PA
    The Pennsylvania Railroad 4800 locomotive, nicknamed “Old Rivets,” was built in 1934-1935 and started service in early 1935.  It was an electric “GG-1” class locomotive and cost about $250,000 to build (about $5.2 million in 2021 dollars). It was also the first of its kind and the only one that had a riveted body, hence the nickname “Old Rivets”.  After that, the builders switched from riveting to welding this type of locomotive. Old Rivets was financed by a loan from the Public Works Administration (PWA). The PWA financed at least 56 more of these GG-1 class trains. (Ultimately, 139 GG-1’s were produced...
  • Adel Swimming Pool - Adel IA
    A public swimming pool in Adel IA was built by the Works Progress Administration in 1935. One of the earliest municipal pools constructed in Iowa, the facility was around for a good share of historical events – war, environmental disasters, and cultural and economic changes. “When the pool was completed,” states Allison McNeal of the Dallas County News, “it was quite an attraction to residents including the fact that it had covered restrooms and a bathhouse, uncommon for the era.” The WPA project also provided unemployment relief for area residents. Over time, the pool faced a lack of upkeep as well as...
  • Flying Yankee Train - Lincoln NH
    The Flying Yankee train was built in 1934-1935 at a cost of $275,000 (about $5.8 million in 2021 dollars). The Public Works Administration (PWA) financed the train’s construction with a loan. The Flying Yankee’s route started in Portland, Maine and ended in Boston, Massachusetts, and it ran from 1935 to 1957 for the Boston & Maine and Maine Central railroads, sometimes under different names, such as “The Business Man.” When it first arrived on the scene it was viewed as a futuristic, technological wonder, with many innovations. It was lightweight, quiet, economic, capable of 100+ mph, and made of stainless steel....
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