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  • Willard Elementary School - Long Beach CA
    Originally constructed in 1926, Willard Elementary School was rehabilitated in 1935 with New Deal funding following the 1933 Long Beach Earthquake. The style is WPA/PWA Moderne. “On August 29, 1933, Long Beach citizens approved a $4,930,000 bond measure for the rebuilding of schools. Applications for approximately thirty-five schools were filed with the Works Progress Administration (WPA) and Public Works Administration (PWA); federal grants up to thirty percent of labor and material costs were obtained. To minimize costs, building materials were salvaged from damaged buildings, some schools were rehabilitated, and new schools were constructed with basic amenities without cafeterias, libraries, auditoriums, swimming...
  • Mann Elementary School - Long Beach CA
    Designed by Watson L. Hawk, Mann Elementary School was built in 1935 with New Deal funding. The style is WPA/PWA Moderne. The 1933 Long Beach Earthquake destroyed hundreds of schools throughout Southern California. “On August 29, 1933, Long Beach citizens approved a $4,930,000 bond measure for the rebuilding of schools. Applications for approximately thirty-five schools were filed with the Works Progress Administration (WPA) and Public Works Administration (PWA); federal grants up to thirty percent of labor and material costs were obtained. To minimize costs, building materials were salvaged from damaged buildings, some schools were rehabilitated, and new schools were constructed with...
  • Lowell Elementary School - Long Beach CA
    Originally constructed in 1926, Lowell Elementary School was rehabilitated in 1935 by Edward Leodore Mayberry with New Deal funding following the 1933 Long Beach Earthquake. The style is WPA/PWA Moderne. The 1933 earthquake destroyed hundreds of schools throughout Southern California. “On August 29, 1933, Long Beach citizens approved a $4,930,000 bond measure for the rebuilding of schools. Applications for approximately thirty-five schools were filed with the Works Progress Administration (WPA) and Public Works Administration (PWA); federal grants up to thirty percent of labor and material costs were obtained. To minimize costs, building materials were salvaged from damaged buildings, some schools were...
  • Long Beach City College, Liberal Arts Campus: Language/Social-Science Building - Long Beach CA
    Three buildings at Long Beach City College's Liberal Arts Campus (formerly Long Beach Junior College) were constructed with Public Works Administration (PWA) funding in 1935. The original campus was destroyed by the 1933 Long Beach Earthquake. The language/social-science building "has 20,700 square feet of floor area and is constructed of wood frame and stucco" (Short & Stanley-Brown, 1939). The building's status—extant or not—is yet to be confirmed. The physical-science and English buildings were also completed with PWA funding at this time.
  • Long Beach City College, Liberal Arts Campus: English Building - Long Beach CA
    Three buildings at Long Beach City College's Liberal Arts Campus (formerly Long Beach Junior College) were constructed with Public Works Administration (PWA) funding in 1935. The original campus was destroyed by the 1933 Long Beach Earthquake. The English building was constructed "of wood frame and stucco, with 17,400 square feet of floor space" (Short & Stanley-Brown, 1939). The building's status—extant or not—is yet to be confirmed. The physical-science and language/social-science buildings were also completed with PWA funding at this time.
  • Ainsworth State Park - Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area OR
    During 1935, Civilian Conservation Corps workers made improvements to Ainsworth State Park, thirty-six miles east of Portland on the Columbia River Highway. John C. Ainsworth, former chairman of the State Highway Commission (1931-1932) donated the original forty acres for the park in 1933. CCC enrollees worked on picnic facilities and trails in the park. Perhaps the most distinctive improvement made by CCC workers involved the stone work steps and fountain that provided public drinking access to the park's spring.
  • Seaboard Air Line Locomotives 2500-2504 (demolished) - Portsmouth VA
    In 1934, the Interstate Commerce Commission approved a loan of $3.5 million from the Public Works Administration (PWA) to the Seaboard Air Line, a railroad company headquartered in Portsmouth, Virginia.  Among the purchases made with this PWA funding were five very large freight locomotives (requiring hefty 2-6-6-4 wheel configurations), to be built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works in Eddystone, Pennsylvania. The engines, numbered 2500 through 2504 were completed in 1935, with the first engine put on display on Sunday, April 28 at Union Station in Raleigh, North Carolina.  Raleigh’s newspaper, The News and Observer, enthusiastically described the new arrivals: “Both awesome...
  • School (former) - Palmyra NE
    A school in Palmyra, Nebraska was constructed with the assistance of federal Public Works Administration (PWA) funds. The PWA provided a $12,015 grant for the project, whose total cost was $41,065. Construction occurred between Oct. 1934 and Mar. 1935. The location and status of the project are unknown to Living New Deal. (PWA Docket No. Neb. 8420)
  • School District Playground - Waterville KS
    In 1935 the county commissioners of Marshall County, KS approved the construction of a school playground at Waterville, financed with $4492.80 in Kansas Emergency Relief Committee (KERC) grant in aid and $968.50 from the KERC material fund. It is unclear whether this funding was for the one grade school in Waterville, or if this funded playgrounds at various one-room schools in the area. The KERC was an arm of the Reconstruction Finance Corp.
  • McDanield Learning Center - Bonner Springs KS
    Bonner Springs, Kansas received a new school in 1935, constructed as a federal Public Works Administration (PWA) project. The facility, located at 110 S Nettleton Ave., is now known as McDanield Learning Center. The building features a 1934 cornerstone and distinctive brickwork. Above the main entrance is an inscription: Dedicated to Character. The PWA provided a $22,500 grant for the project, whose total cost was $83,435. Construction started in May 1934 and was completed in May 1935. PWA Docket No. 3229.
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