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  • Number One Shelterbelt - Willow OK
    The first tree of the Great Plains Shelterbelt, an Austrian pine, was planted at the Ed Curtis farm near Willow, Oklahoma, on March 18, 1935. The state forester of Oklahoma, George Phillips, did the honors. The Great Plains Shelterbelt was designed to mitigate damage from the 1930s dust storms.
  • Baltimore & Ohio Railroad: Royal Blue Train – Baltimore MD
    In 1934, Daniel Willard, president of the Baltimore & Ohio (B&O) railroad, “negotiated a $900,000 Public Works Administration loan which would be used to make B & O’s New York-Washington line an industry-wide proving ground for various types of lightweight train construction and high-speed steam and diesel power” (Harwood, 1990). Among the equipment constructed with this loan was the Royal Blue, a streamline train set consisting of eight cars made out of aluminum and lightweight steel. The Royal Blue was a reincarnation of a popular B&O train service from the turn of the century plus “a quarter of a century of...
  • Goosewing Guard Station – Bridger-Teton National Forest WY
    In 1934-35, Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers stationed in the Bridger-Teton National Forest constructed five new buildings to create the Goosewing Guard Station, including a central dwelling, two gashouses, a barn and a garage. Originally built as a winter shelter for rangers monitoring elk grazing conditions, the U.S. Forest Service utilized Goosewing Guard Station until it fell into disrepair in the early 2000s. All five buildings were built following standard architectural plans created by U.S. Forest Service regional architect George L. Nichols. Because of Nichols’ contributions to the region in the 1930s (made possible through New Deal funding and labor), the majority...
  • Hoback Guard Station – Bridger-Teton National Forest WY
    In 1935, Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers stationed in the Bridger-Teton National Forest constructed three buildings for the Hoback Guard Station: an office/dwelling, a shed, and a garage.  There is a fourth building on the site that is not CCC. The CCC buildings were constructed with an architectural style typical of CCC workmanship, with notched logs and square floor plans. All of the buildings remain in use by the U.S. Forest Service with minimal physical alterations. The central office/dwelling is available to the public for short-term rentals and overnight stays.  
  • Guy W. Talbot State Park Improvements - Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area OR
    Guy W. Talbot State Park, also known as Latourell Falls State Park, entered the Oregon State Park system in 1929 when the Talbot family donated 125 acres of land adjacent to Latourell Falls. Significant development of the park, however, began in 1933 when Civilian Conservation Corps enrollees from nearby CCC Camp Benson initiated work. CCC projects improved the park during the second period of the CCC (October 1933 to Arpil 1934), the third period (April to October 1934), and the fifth period (April to October 1935). As noted in a report completed in 1946 under the supervision of the Oregon State...
  • Donalds Grange No. 497 - Donalds SC
    Fieldstone structure built by the Works Progress Administration in 1935 for grange meetings. Also has been used as a city hall and library. Still in use as a grange hall. According to Brian Scott (The Historical Marker Database) "Construction in 1935 by local Works Progress Administration (WPA) labor on land donated by W. Maxie Agnew, the building served originally as the home of the town hall, the grange, and the public library. Since its inception, the fieldstone building has been the meeting hall for the agricultural organization known locally and most commonly as the Donalds Grange."
  • Old Fire Station - Chester IL
    The Old Fire Station in Chester, Illinois was constructed in 1935 and served as a firehouse until 1961. The decommissioned building is presently used for storage. While some documents are unable to distinguish the particular New Deal agency responsible for the construction—Public Works Administration (PWA) vs. Works Progress Administration (WPA)—PWA records make no mention of such a project, and the documentation is consistent with WPA specifications. NRHP nomination: "The two-story rough-cut stone building has a footprint of about 28 by 36 feet and was constructed using recycled stone from a razed building that was located on a street near the Mississippi River.......
  • Waterworks - Bridgeport WV
    A waterworks construction project in Bridgeport, West Virginia was undertaken with the aid of federal Public Works Administration (PWA) funds. The PWA supplied a $10,000 loan and $3,493 grant toward the $13,649 eventual total cost of the project. Work occurred between Aug. 1934 and Jan. 1935. PWA Docket No. 2761
  • Hettinger County Courthouse - Mott ND
    The historic Hettinger County Courthouse in Mott, North Dakota was constructed as a federal Public Works Administration (PWA) project. The PWA supplied a $30,622 grant for the project, whose total cost was $108,243. Primary construction occurred between Sept. 1934 and Nov. 1935. PWA Docket No. 6106
  • Waterworks and Sewers - Matewan WV
    A waterworks and sewer construction project in Matewan, West Virginia was undertaken with the aid of federal Public Works Administration (PWA) funds. The PWA supplied a $42,000 loan and $12,866 grant toward the $54,523 eventual total cost of the project. Work occurred between Jan. and Oct. 1935. PWA Docket No. 7043
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