All in this Together

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Dear Friends of the Living New Deal,

Like you, we’re rattled. As of today at midnight, the 7 million people living in the Bay Area were put under “lock down” to arrest the spread of the corona virus. Schools, shops, offices, theaters, and other centers of public life have closed. That includes the University of California, Berkeley, where the offices of the Living New Deal are housed.

None of us has lived through anything like this before. But some of us who have lived through a crisis or two may find a few silver linings. History tells us that crises often create the conditions for fundamental change. After all, the Great Depression brought us Social Security; the March of Dimes, inspired by FDR, brought forth the polio vaccine; World War II produced post-war prosperity and a growing middle class.

For the Living New Deal, the shut down is a chance to pause, think big, and focus on projects in our pipeline―notably producing a New Deal map of Washington DC; creating alliances with activists for a Green New Deal; and planning some high-profile events we look forward to hosting in the months ahead.

One of the joys of working for the Living New Deal is that its mission inspires others as well. We are grateful for all the many ways you contribute to making others aware of the New Deal and the compassionate leadership the New Dealers brought to their challenge. Imagine how differently they would respond to the situation at hand than the current Administration. We can only hope that the crises in public health, economic inequality, and climate change will lead voters to demand change.

For now, we have been asked to practice ‘social distancing.’ But that doesn’t mean we can’t be in touch. We welcome hearing from you and we will be reaching out as well. We’re all in this together. May we all meet on the other side of this distancing with gifts to share.

Be well.

The Living New Deal

All in this Together

Featured

Dear Friends of the Living New Deal,

Like you, we’re rattled. As of today at midnight, the 7 million people living in the Bay Area were put under “lock down” to arrest the spread of the corona virus. Schools, shops, offices, theaters, and other centers of public life have closed. That includes the University of California, Berkeley, where the offices of the Living New Deal are housed.

None of us has lived through anything like this before. But some of us who have lived through a crisis or two may find a few silver linings. History tells us that crises often create the conditions for fundamental change. After all, the Great Depression brought us Social Security; the March of Dimes, inspired by FDR, brought forth the polio vaccine; World War II produced post-war prosperity and a growing middle class.

For the Living New Deal, the shut down is a chance to pause, think big, and focus on projects in our pipeline―notably producing a New Deal map of Washington DC; creating alliances with activists for a Green New Deal; and planning some high-profile events we look forward to hosting in the months ahead.

One of the joys of working for the Living New Deal is that its mission inspires others as well. We are grateful for all the many ways you contribute to making others aware of the New Deal and the compassionate leadership the New Dealers brought to their challenge. Imagine how differently they would respond to the situation at hand than the current Administration. We can only hope that the crises in public health, economic inequality, and climate change will lead voters to demand change.

For now, we have been asked to practice ‘social distancing.’ But that doesn’t mean we can’t be in touch. We welcome hearing from you and we will be reaching out as well. We’re all in this together. May we all meet on the other side of this distancing with gifts to share.

Be well.

The Living New Deal

Mayor De Blasio Invokes the New Deal for Lessons on How to Tackle the COVID-19 Crisis

In a March 16 media appearance, New York City Mayor Mayor Bill De Blasio discussed school closures across New York City, part of what he calls a wartime approach to combat COVID-19. This crisis might put millions out of work and will require extraordinary interventions. De Blasio pointed out that we already know how to do it because we did it before in the New Deal.

Exhibit: Posters for a New Age Inspired by New Deal Art

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Update:

The Fri., March 6, 6-8pm – Opening Reception will take place as scheduled.
We will not to serve food this event, but will provide wine, beer, and water.
We will also provide soap/water and hand sanitizer.
An update about the March 20 event will be posted next week.

Fri., March 6, 6-8pm – Opening Reception

Fri., March 13, 6pm, “Art and Activism, Posters as Tools of Social Change,” presented by LND founder Gray Brechin and Max Slavin, Creative Action Network.

Fri., March 20, 6pm, Program featuring the Sunrise Movement: “Taking Action for a Green New Deal,” presented by the Sunrise Movement.

Opening March 6 at Canessa Gallery in San Francisco, “Art and Activism: From the New Deal to the Green New Deal,” and exhibit of WPA and contemporary posters, connects the Green New Deal to its New Deal roots.  As the Creative Action Network notes, “During the Great Depression, Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal employed artists, graphic designers, and printers—many from the San Francisco Bay Area—to produce posters promoting public health, education, national parks, and the arts. Today, in response to the climate crisis, a new generation of activists turns to the power of poster to demand a Green New Deal.” the opening reception is on Friday, March 6. On Friday, March 13, the gallery will host the Living New Deal’s Gray Brechin, speaking about the New Deal, along with Max Slavin of the Creative Action Network. On Friday, March 20, a program featured the Sunrise Movement’s activism for a Green New Deal.  All events are at 7pm.  RSVP is requested. Find more details here and here, and RSVP here.

Professor Eric Rauchway, Living New Deal Board Member, Interviewed on National Public Radio

US President Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882 – 1945) signs the Social Security Act, 14th August 1935. (Photo by FPG/Archive Photos/Getty Images)

Eric Rauchway, UC Davis Professor of History and Living New Deal Board Member, spoke about the New Deal with Kara Miller of Innovation Hub, National Public Radio. Rauchway examined how the Roosevelt Administration’s reforms changed Americans’ lives and restored faith in government. Listen to the program here.

In a recent Living New Deal Newsletter post, Living New Deal Founder, Gray Brechin, reviewed Eric Rauchway’s latest book, Winter War: Hoover, Roosevelt, and the First Clash Over the New Deal. 

Professor Teresa Ghilarducci Joins the Living New Deal New York City Branch’s Advisory Council

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(Photo by: Martha Susana Jaimes)

We are thrilled to welcome Teresa Ghilarducci to the Living New Deal NYC branch’s Advisory Council. A labor economist and nationally-recognized expert in retirement security, Ghilarducci is the Bernard L. and Irene Schwartz Professor of Economics at the New School for Social Research. She is an ardent supporter of a Green New Deal—and also, a gray one.

In her recent keynote address at the annual meeting of the Association for Social Economics, Ghilarducci drew attention to what she called a “doomsday” for pensions. Without a Gray New Deal that allows seniors to receive pensions and retire in dignity, she predicts that almost half of middle-class workers over 50 will be poor or near-poor retirees by 2030. Get her take on the policy debate surrounding retirement present and future here.

The Orange County Register Reports: Historic Sewage Digester Building in Laguna Beach Might be Saved

Laguna Beach Water treatment tower was built in 1935. Photo by Photo: Charles Swaney © Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 2013.

The Orange County Register writes that a prominent family has offered to save from demolition the historic sewage digester building at entrance to Laguna Beach. Last year, the Living New Deal raised awareness about Laugna Beach resident’s efforts to save the tower.

“In a letter to the city that arrived hours before the City Council was set to debate the building’s fate, philanthropists Barbara and Greg MacGillivray cited the New Deal structure’s historical significance and offered to pay a portion of the renovation cost.

Previous estimates put demolition and renovation at about $2.5 million.”

Read the story here.

2020 New Deal Legacy calendar

By Evan Kalish

The 2020 New Deal Legacy calendar highlights another dozen fantastic projects undertaken by various agencies of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal. This year’s collection takes us all across the country, from the Caribbean (U.S. Virgin Islands) to the Northwest—and everywhere in-between. It includes magnificent artwork and gorgeous Art Deco structures; projects large and small from New Mexico to New York. Get your copy here.

Also by the same author, the Postlandia Calendar 2020 tells the stories of another dozen amazing post offices from across the United States. You can purchase the calendar here.